Arts and Entertainment

Anguished-sounding Tennessee singer/keyboards player Whitlock followed Eric Clapton from Delaney & Bonnie into Derek and the Dominos.

Obituary: Colin Manley

"COLIN MANLEY was brilliant," Paul McCartney said during an interview on BBC Radio Merseyside in 1988. "He was the finest guitarist around Liverpool in the early 1960s and he could do all that Chet Atkins stuff with two fingers. A lot of the lads tried to play like that, but only Colin could do it really well."

No constable, everything's fine

PETER YORK ON ADS NUMBER 255: YELLOW PAGES

Service that lands before it takes off celebrates its 21st birthday

TWENTY-ONE YEARS ago an aircraft took off from Heathrow, made a deafening noise somewhere west of Ireland, and, after its passengers had sipped some Krug and supped on the finest beluga caviare, landed in New York two hours before it had taken off. It was an unprecedented event in the history of air travel.

Spirit of the Age: Rebirth of an ancient religion

LET ME tell you everything you know already about the Hare Krishna movement. Orange robes. Shaved heads. Tinkly finger-cymbals. Endless chanting in the rainy high streets of Britain's provincial towns. Hare Krishna, Hare Hare, Hare Rama, Hare Krishna. George Harrison's Tudor manor at Letchmore Heath. Disputes over noise with neighbours. Er, that's it.

Pop: The real wild men of rock

Why use lawyers when a spot of GBH will do? Marion `Suge' Knight was not the first music biz manager to use direct methods, nor will he be the last.

Words: Jack, n.

FRANK SINATRA long credited "Something" to Lennon and McCartney - and amended George Harrison's lyric: "You stick around, Jack, it might show."

ORIGINAL SINS?

THE FULL MONTY

Amen corner

The map: Need a Spiritual Energy Radiator in your life? Want to hang out at George Harrison's old pad? What you need is Michael Booth's guide to cult HQs. Illustration by Otto

Edinburgh Festival: Jazz: A maestro in full bloom

HERBIE FLOWERS GRAFFITI

George Harrison tells of battle with cancer

GEORGE HARRISON, the former Beatle, has been treated for throat cancer, but was given a medical all-clear last month. He has blamed his illness entirely on an on-off smoking habit.

Cries And Whispers: With all these egos, Oasis won't Be Here Now much longer

THIS COULD be a case for Mulder and Scully: there was a confirmed sighting this week of a Noel Gallagher recording with no guitars on it, no drums, and no chord-sequence that bears a resemblance to anything by the Beatles. The track is called "Teohuacan", and it can be found on the X-Files movie's soundtrack album, out this week. It's a ghostly, trip- hoppy instrumental (a sensible idea, considering Noel's lyrics), and in a way it's his most Beatle-ish recording to date, in that it shows he doesn't always take the movie's slogan, "Fight The Future", to heart. It's either a sign that Oasis's own future is much brighter and more fruitful than Be Here Now led us to believe, or it's a sign that Oasis's days are numbered. It's up to Noel to decide which.

Apple fails to account for itself

APPLE Corps, the private limited company which receives royalties from the Beatles' music and films, has fallen foul of Companies House for not filing its accounts on time.

Beatles win historic ban on bootleg CD

IT WAS the "crummiest" recording ever to be associated with The Beatles. It brought the reclusive George Harrison into a courtroom in high dudgeon. And it resulted yesterday in a landmark victory for musicians.

Python stars sue to regain control of `Life of Brian'

THE STARS of Monty Python yesterday launched an action in the High Court to try to win back control over their film Life of Brian.

College days remembered

In The autumn of 1969 I was a research student in the English department of Manchester University, a late entrant who'd intended to continue his studies at Hull. Despairing of the loneliness of postgraduate life in a new town, I was happy to fall in with a crowd of interesting, bar-based students, the nucleus being a fellow English researcher who'd just returned from a creative writing course at an American university and had been in the same class as reclusive novelist Thomas Pynchon. Cool.
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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine