George Harrison

The 10 Best documentary DVDs

It’s possible to lose yourself for hours - in some cases, weeks - to these beautifully shot non-fiction films...

Sultan Khan: Indian vocalist and doyen of the sarangi

Sultan Khan was a hereditary sarangiya – a sarangi player – and one of the preeminent Hindustani or Northern Indian classical soloists of our age. He played one of the most brutish-looking instruments humanity has ever devised. Yet the voices that he coaxed from this squat, bowed, stringed instrument were divine. The instrument's name derives from two words meaning "100 colours", but Sultan Khan proved that the sarangi hid many more than that. Many hold it to be the instrument able to capture the nuances and tonal range of the human voice the most faithfully. Many – Mickey Hart, the Grateful Dead drummer-turned-Smithsonian Folkwayswallah who recorded him included – hold sarangi to be the greatest melody instrument ever devised. And without question, Khan was one of sarangi's all-time virtuosi.

Don Was: Mixmeister Flash

He watched Bob Dylan torment George Harrison – and reckons that Keith Richards has one of the sharpest minds in music. Don Was, producer of choice to rock's elite, talks to David Sinclair

Album: Rolling Stones, Shine a Light (Universal)

Martin Scorsese has become the official hallmark of classic-rock-cred: first the Dylan documentary, then this Stones concert film, and next up, the George Harrison bio-doc. He's undoubtedly qualified for the job, but I'm not sure I want to hear him muttering "OK! First song!" over the opening of "Jumping Jack Flash": it imposes a too businesslike attitude over an event not exactly short of that commodity in the first place.

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