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Group splits up as animals flee, with four taking the odd decision to just stand still in the path of the snow

Caribbean Food: Waiter, there's a bone in my goat soup

The Blue Mountains of Jamaica are home to what some say is the best coffee in the world. It's also where you can tuck in to a soup made of goat's entrails...

Wildlife thieves strip woodland of rare caterpillars

THE GIANT caterpillars of one of Britain's most spectacular insects, the rare goat moth, have been stolen from a woodland nature reserve by specialist wildlife thieves.

Why MPs insist that Acts of Parliament still need the slaughter of Norwegian goats

WHO WILL stand up for the goat? Even this animal rights-conscious Parliament, prepared to risk the wrath of the Countryside Alliance over hunting foxes, is determined to cover its library in goatskin.

Prehistoric iceman liked to eat goats

THE PREHISTORIC iceman found in the Alps in 1991 was a meat- eater and not a vegan, as previous research suggested.

Advert provokes storm in a Y-front

A STORM has broken out over an advertisement for Scotland's unofficial national drink, Irn-Bru, which shows a woman nibbling at a pair of Y-fronts.

Country Matters: The Duke's lesson on reality

When the Duke of Buccleuch entertains schoolchildren and their teachers to open days on one of his estates in southern Scotland, he does it in true ducal style. On the morning I went to Drumlanrig, his castle on the Queensberry Estate, north of Dumfries, more than 600 children came pouring in by coach from far and wide, and nearly 1,000 were expected on the morrow. Apart from their transport, for which they had to pay, the schools got their outings free; but the two days cost the estate some pounds 10,000 in lost working time, the provision of vehicles, the setting up of tents and so on.

Word of mouth: The big cheese

Caroline Stacey meets cheesemaker Mary Holbrook

Goats suffer in submarine tests

HUNDREDS OF goats are being subjected to "excruciating" pain by military scientists experimenting to see what could happen to sailors trapped in a sunken submarine.

COMPETITION: LITERALLY LOST NUMBER 56

THIS EXCERPT is taken from a work of travel literature. Readers are invited to tell us: a) where the action is taking place, and b) who is the author? Blackwell's Bookshops will award pounds 30 worth of book tokens to the first correct answer pulled out of the hat. Answers on a postcard, please, to: Literally Lost, Independent on Sunday, 1 Canada Square, London E14 5DL. Usual competition rules apply. Entries to arrive by this Thursday.

The Sketch: Ron the non-confessor speaks a lot but says nothing

THE LAST time Ron Davies spoke in the Commons it was on the Bill establishing a Welsh Assembly, including a contentious Government amendment requiring the Welsh Executive to sign the Official Secrets Act. Mr Davies commended this amendment to the House and there have been several times in the past few days when his tight-lipped manner suggested that he had promulgated a private extension of this legislation to cover his own misadventures on Clapham Common.

Food & Drink: A match made in Auvergne

Drinking Champagne with cheese is a divine indulgence, says Anthony Rose

Evolutionary Notes: We are apes, whether we like it or not

CHARLES DARWIN shocked Victorian society by, as they thought, suggesting that "man is descended from the apes". What he really suggested, of course, is that humans and the hairy apes (the chimpanzee and gorilla) share a common ancestor, a creature more "ape-like" than "man-like". But now the argument has been turned on its head.

Why men fall for mother's lookalike

A MAN is more likely to fall in love with women who look like his mother, according to a study showing for the first time that the Oedipus complex has some scientific basis.

Letter: Cruelty to goats

Sir: Your article, "Goats used by MoD in submarine experiments" (3 August) says, "A minority of the experiments was conducted on animals that had not been anaesthetised." What is so terrible about today's experiments is that an increasing number are psychological tests which have to be done on conscious animals to gauge their mental and physical endurance of pain and deprivation.

Goats used by MoD in submarine experiments

THERE HAS been a huge increase in the number of animals killed or subjected to horrific injuries in painful and sometimes bizarre research projects carried out by the Ministry of Defence.
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine