Sport Jose Barkero accused four Levante team-mates of deliberately not trying against Deportivo in April

In April, Levante were 3-0 down at half-time, and in the dressing midfielder Jose Barkero accused some of his team-mates of deliberately not trying

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Travel: Climbing to the peak of fitness: Max Wooldridge hit the hot, hard trail to mainland Spain's highest mountains. And lived to tell the tale . . .

I was three weeks too late for the romeria, the annual midnight trek to the top of Mulhacen, the highest peak in mainland Spain. During the night of 5 August each year, Andalucian pilgrims climb the 11,420ft mountain in honour of the Virgin of the Snows. These noctural ascents have at least one advantage - they avoid 'red runs', or long periods of walking in direct sunshine.

The Week Ahead: Unions plan wave of protest strikes

TRADE UNIONS in Belgium plan a week of protests against government austerity plans, culminating in a general strike on Friday - dubbed 'red Friday' by the Socialist union leader, Francois Janssens. The provinces of Limburg, Liege and Antwerp are to down tools today and the other six on Wednesday.

MUSIC / The whole world on six strings: Why would anyone take up the classical guitar? John Williams puts the case for an 'underprivileged' instrument to Nick Kimberley

IT WAS the conquistadores who introduced the guitar to the Americas. You could say that the conquered lands took their revenge by first passing the guitar from Latin America to North America, and then re-colonising the world. As we approach the end of the 20th century, the guitar can claim to have provided the century's musical voice, around the globe.

Dark light

MADRID (AP) - More than 30 people suffered eye injuries as they stared at the sun awaiting an appearance of the Virgin Mary predicted by an 18-year-old religious seer, Esteban Sanchez Casas. One thousand people went to Baza, north-east of Granada, on 11 June to await the miracle. Hospital officials said at least eight have irreversible retinal damage.

Travel: How to get the best out of Malaga: Adios to the stuffed donkeys: With the 'highway of death' bypassed, Malaga's older charm is being exposed. David Hewson goes exploring

THESE days Malaga boasts a spanking new white marble airport, all people-movers and duty-frees as befits one of the Mediterranean's busiest destinations. Thirty years ago there was just a little airstrip and the terminal was a handsome villa.

Granada to back bid for 1bn national lottery

GRANADA, the television and contract catering group, is set to widen its interests further by backing a bid for the pounds 1bn-a-year national lottery.

Central chief attacks 'crazy' rules: Consortium bid for ITN's news service finally goes unconditional

CENTRAL Independent Television, the ITV company that is paying just pounds 2,000 for its Midlands franchise, announced a bumper dividend as it reported a 68 per cent hike in pre-tax profits to pounds 41.1m for 1992.

Travel: The apres-ski is so Moorish: This week we traverse the Iberian Peninsula - skiing in Andorra, unveiling the new face of the Costa del Sol, reliving ferry journeys of the Seventies. Here, Stephen Wood experiences Andalucia - up and down - on the slopes of the Sierra Nevada and in the old city of Granada

Andalucia, in southern Spain, has its ups and downs like everywhere else, it's just that they are closer together. Malaga, the hub of Spain's lager-and-timeshare culture, is as low as you can go without drowning; but two hours up the road is the Alhambra, the magnificent 14th-century citadel of Granada's Moorish civilisation. A further 45 minutes away is the ski resort of the Sierra Nevada, one of the highest in Europe and currently cranking itself up to host the World Championships in 1995. On a clear day you can see Africa from the top of the pistes.

Obituary: Luis Rosales

Luis Rosales Camacho, poet, critic and academic, born Granada 31 May 1910, died Madrid 24 October 1992.

Racing: Cecil pursues winning pattern

ANOTHER disastrous year for Henry Cecil: just 80 winners on the board, almost pounds 800,000 in prize-money, the provider of more winning rides for Pat Eddery, Steve Cauthen and Willie Ryan than any other trainer. But failure comes in many forms and the absence of the flag-raising ceremony at Warren Place that denotes victory at the highest level, a Group One race, means that 1992 must go down as as a disappointing year for the former champion trainer, writes John Cobb.

Caver killed

(First Edition)

Departures: Smutty trip

MS A BAKER of Swansea writes that she recently went on a coach holiday with a local firm. She says the 'in-coach' entertainment consisted largely of smutty jokes.
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003