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Paul Scoon was Governor-General of the former British Caribbean colony of Grenada in 1983 when the little group of seven islands, best known for their beaches and their nutmeg, mace and other spices, became the world's No 1 headline. Grenada had been independent, though still a Commonwealth realm, since 1974 and Scoon, a native though UK-educated Grenadian, had been Governor-General since 1978. His was a largely ceremonial role until the events of October 1983 which led to a US invasion ordered by President Ronald Reagan at Scoon's request.

Travel File

Electric travel in France

US seeks more 'safe havens' for Haitians

REJECTED by Panama and Honduras, the US is now looking for a temporary home for Haitian boat-people in countries better known to philatelists than diplomats. Grenada, where the US was recently considering closing its embassy, has agreed to help. So has Antigua.

Cricket / Fifth Test: Hooper needed for right balance: Tony Cozier sees the West Indies attack suffer without the variety of a spinner

RICHIE RICHARDSON and Desmond Haynes are absent, but the West Indies hardly noticed it as Brian Lara did as he pleased. The player the West Indies have missed most in conditions as good for batting as they are - and as they were in Barbados - is in England, being treated for the back injury that kept him out of the series, and hoping to play for Kent in the coming season.

Travel: Picking islands in a sea of plenty: On a recent trip to the Caribbean, Hunter Davies planted his flag on a handful of new discoveries

Just spent two weeks in the Grenadines - not a regiment, islands in the West Indies - adding to my bijou collection of Caribbean countries. All a bit confusing, these Grenadines. St Vincent and the Grenadines, which consists of some 32 islands, is one country. Grenada is another country, but it gives its name to the islands and it does have a couple of its own. Is that clear?

Cricket: Fraser the key to hope of victory: England seek 350 total

ENGLAND have made such a remarkable comeback from the trauma of their 46 all out in Trinidad that it is enough to make regular watchers break out into a cold sweat. If it is at all possible to make a total porridge out of a second-innings lead of 222 with seven wickets and two days in hand, they are undoubtedly the one side capable of pulling it off.

Cricket: England enter least promising arena for revival: Atherton questions the attitude of some players and looks for greater commitment from dispirited tourists in the fourth Test, which starts today

There are still two weeks and two Test matches in which to salvage something from the wreckage, but England may be too badly drained to respond. The island paradise bit tends to lose its appeal when you are getting totally stuffed, and in terms of remaining focused on the job England are now in closer mental touch with the snug bar at the Plough and Firkin than the dressing-room at the Kensington Oval.

Cricket: Malcom's Test target

DEVON MALCOLM believes he is ready to play in the fourth Test against the West Indies starting in Bridgetown tomorrow. Whether Mike Atherton and his fellow England selectors concur is another matter.

Cricket: England batting in Grenada

England losing their last six wickets for 18 runs yesterday to finish on 319 in their first innings of a four-day match against the West Indies Board XI at Queen's Park, Grenada.

Cricket: No holiday for beached England: Test for returning Malcolm's knee comes against a batting line-up that is quite capable of thrashing any attack

AT THIS stage of England's disintegrating tour, it does not so much resemble a visit to Grenada, a golden-beached Caribbean island, as Granada, a service station on the M6. Having almost been cleaned up by a 20-ton juggernaut, England have spotted an 'Ambrose kills - take a break' notice, and pulled in for a leg-stretch and a pot of tea.

BOOK REVIEW / Sevens above: the nightmare explodes: 'Swimming in the Volcano' - Bob Shacochis: Picador, 15.99 pounds

MAKE a dot in the sea; magnify it to a workable size; populate and outfit it. Is there anything more alluring to the world-builder than an island state, a tropical one at that? This one is called St Catherine, and it features beach bars, slums, an aid community, fishermen, government corruption and political rivalry, insanity, a retreat for decadent rock stars, and, of course, the symbolic volcano above it all. The date is 1977, the numerologically ominous year when, in the song of the Jamaican group Culture, the two sevens clashed.

History haunts Clinton over Bosnia

FROM Vietnam to the Holocaust, historical ghosts haunt President Bill Clinton as he agonises over possible United States military intervention in Bosnia. But perhaps none more so than those of arguably the most tumultuous foreign policy week of Ronald Reagan's first term.

Cricket: Wasim feeling the demands of command post: West Indies' stunning first Test victory has given them a psychological edge over the tourists and their captain

AFETR less than three months in office, Wasim Akram, international cricket's newest and youngest captain, has suddenly been confronted with a crisis.

Cricket: Wasim and Waqar prepare to weave their magic: Pitch conditions should suit Pakistan's balanced bowling attack in the first Test of an eagerly anticipated series against the West Indies

FINALLY persuaded to proceed with their West Indies tour, Pakistan's embattled, and still embittered, cricketers will find welcome solace in the support and the conditions likely to greet them in the first Test starting here today.
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