Arts and Entertainment Angela Lansbury is set return to the London stage after a hiatus of almost four decades

The actress will return to the Gielgud Theatre where she made her debut

Double Falsehood, Union Theatre, London<br/>Becky Shaw, Almeida Theatre, London<br/>Little Platoons, Bush Theatre, London

A few passages in this 'new Shakespeare' sound suspiciously 18th-century, but more often its flow is credibly Jacobean

Cultural Life: Rosamund Pike, actress

Film: My favourite cinema is the Arclight Hollywood. I saw a double bill there recently: Sofia Coppola's 'Somewhere', followed by 'The Fighter'. I found 'Somewhere' slight in comparison. But I'd stayed at the Chateau Marmont and I was curious to see 'Somewhere'. I'd always thought it would be fun to capture that hotel, as it holds a special place in my LA life. 'Blue Valentine' was very painful to watch and it doesn't change your life. 'The King's Speech' lets you right in. The director told a true and simple story, very beautifully.

Less Than Kind, Jermyn Street Theatre, London

The celebrations of the Terence Rattigan centenary won't throw up anything more enjoyably peculiar and intriguing than this novelty with which they now kick off. Less Than Kind is the hitherto unperformed original version of Rattigan's 1944 hit play Love in Idleness. A contemporary reworking of the basic situation in Hamlet, it centres on Michael Brown, an idealistic 17-year-old who returns from wartime evacuation in Canada only to find that his widowed mother is living in sin with the Claudius-figure, Sir John Fletcher, multi-millionaire right-wing industrialist and the embodiment of everything Michael passionately loathes.

James Lawton: Warne delivers unkindest cut of all to Ponting

If the close of every great sports event brings inevitable regrets, along with the glory, sometimes the pathos level runs especially high. This has surely been true at the Sydney Cricket Ground these last few days. Indeed, it has been easy to remember that the end of a fine, taut golf tournament amid the haunting beauty of Pebble Beach was once described as a "little death".

Angelina Jolie: 'Johnny has seen me with my kids. He has seen me giggling...'

With their new film topping the box-office charts, Angelina Jolie and Johnny Depp talk candidly to Gill Pringle about life in the spotlight

Romeo and Juliet, Roundhouse, London

Rupert Goold's tempestuous yet tender production of Romeo and Juliet is more or less everything that the rave notices claimed when it premiered in Stratford last spring.

Playing with fire: Johnny Vegas takes on Anton Chekhov

We've had the knitted monkey, the epic benders and the wedding pictures sold to 'Viz', but life's not always been a laugh for Johnny Vegas. He opens up to Brian Viner about the abuse at his seminary, the assault that changed his life &ndash; and his fears at taking on Anton Chekhov

Harriet Walker: What about some land for the poor?

Cronyism (noun, abst): the divvying up of the decent bits and the giving of them to one's mates. If you want the most enduring image of cronyism, think not of Iraq and Halliburton or Simon Cowell and Cheryl Cole's stellar career. Instead, go all the way back to the Domesday Book, which catalogues the land shared out by William the Conqueror to the feudal lords that helped him win.

The Week In Radio: Dragon turns his fire on our modern malaise

After the past week, we could probably all answer GCSE questions on employment and support allowance, child benefit and defence budgets. But as the spending review sank in, it was Radio 2 that ventured the most interesting question of the week. Can Money Make You Happy? was a title that was never going to need a spoiler alert. Presented by the thoughtful dragon Duncan Bannatyne, it was a probing and rather inspiring documentary.

Sarah Sands: The play's the thing, and the coalition should cherish it

It is unusual for a new production of Hamlet to be a front-page news story. It is remarkable when the actor playing him is not a film or television star, but a jobbing actor in his early thirties. The critical recognition of Rory Kinnear's Hamlet is about the most cheering thing to happen to the arts since rumours of the scale of the projected cuts took hold.

Hamlet, NT Olivier, London<br/>Hamlet, Crucible, Sheffield<br/>Enlightenment, Hampstead Theatre, London

Two star-name Hamlets at once was bound to invite comparisons. Simm's Prince was patchy, but Rory Kinnear was superb

First Night: Hamlet, National Theatre, London

Here comes the son, with ghosts of Hamlets past

First Night: Hamlet, Sheffield Crucible

Smooth transfer from 'Life on Mars' to death in Denmark
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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003