Arts and Entertainment

The country was the breakaway Republic of Biafra, which seceded from Nigeria in 1967, in response to the continuing persecution of the Igbo people.

LETTERS : Euro pooches

IN HIS profile of Pauline Green ("Labour's other leader", 5 February), Andrew Marshall implies that some Labour MEPs' objection to Tony Blair's desire to abandon Clause IV shows that the party has not lost the ability to shoot itself in the foot. Was it not Mr Blair's action in resurrecting a dead issue that provoked the shooting?

Wednesday morning 11am: back to sleep : Inside Parliament

The word "historic" was much bandied about yesterday as the House of Commons met for the first of its new Wednesday morning sittings. But by 11am, with barely a dozen MPs in the chamber raking over the embers of the Pergau dam affair, "soporific"

IN BRIEF: Peer dies

Lord Kagan, a former confidant of the Labour prime minister Harold Wilson, has died aged 79.

Wilson inherits £800m deficit from Tories

CABINET SECRETS OF 1964: Stephen Ward and Stephen Castle review files n ow in the public domain

Labour and Whitehall mistrusted each other

CABINET SECRETS OF 1964: Stephen Ward and Stephen Castle review files n ow in the public domain

Troops Threat

THE CABINET CRISIS OF 1964

Radical who lost his way

Keith Joseph, who died on Saturday, earned his niche in history by his role in his party's transition from post-1945 one-nation Toryism to Thatcherism, which he launched almost unawares.

Leading Article: Bold, but Blair must also be brave

THIS WAS probably a historic speech. Since John Smith's death last May, Tony Blair has wooed not just his party but the nation. Yesterday when he declared, 'We are the mainstream voice in politics today', it was only a mild exaggeration.

The sad passing of the naked exhibitionist: Keith Elliott charts the rise and demise of the streakers

WHO remembers streakers? Twenty years ago, a young window-dresser from Kingston upon Thames called Sally Cooper streaked across Kingston bridge with four friends. Her streak, and the arrest that followed, won her brief media fame. It also earned her a bite on the bottom from an eager police dog. But, apart from the occasional sports enthusiast, streakers have now disappeared.

View from City Road: The business of being different

Not for the first time, the two voices of British business, the Confederation of British Industry and the Institute of Directors, are at loggerheads. The CBI supports Michael Heseltine in the cabinet row about state support for business. The IoD is behind Michael Portillo.

Letter: Modern Rachmans still prosper on the poor

Sir: Thank you for your interesting, if grim, feature ('Life in a house of horrors', 16 July) highlighting the present-day struggle between leaseholders and their landlords.

Leading Article: Blair must find Wilson's fire

THE election of Tony Blair as Labour's 14th leader marks a turning point for the party. It is not only of symbolic importance that all Labour members, not just union barons and individual activists, have had the right to a direct vote in the choice of their leader. The practical effect of this more democratic procedure has been enormous. Without John Smith's one-member, one-vote reform, the likelihood of Mr Blair or anybody of his ilk achieving Labour's top job would have been negligible.

MI5 says 80% of terror plots foiled: Director-General gives Dimbleby lecture

THE SECURITY services foil 80 per cent of terrorist attacks attempted in Northern Ireland, Stella Rimington, the Director-General of MI5, said in a BBC television lecture last night. She disclosed that MI5 dedicates nearly half its resources to tackling Irish terrorism.

TELEVISION / Confident Sharpe enlists the ridiculous

PLAYING Napoleon can't be good for a man. In Sharpe (ITV), Ron Cook brushed his hair over his forehead and peered up from the bottom half of the screen, like a man straining to look over a fence. Someone called Ducos was telling him what to do next in the Peninsular War, which may have explained why he was hissing like a malfunctioning Ascot. Ducos wanted to reorder the course of European diplomacy in order to take his revenge on Major Sharpe. Napoleon said yes.

Monstrous theft

Screaming Lord Sutch, leader of the Monster Raving Loony Party, appealed for the return of his top hat, stolen while he was playing a rock gig at the Conservative club at Barry Island, South Wales. He first wore it when he stood against Harold Wilson in 1963.
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University Edible Garden, Leeds – a sustainable garden in the centre of the university, passers-by can help themselves to the home-grown produce
newsFrom a former custard factory to a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery
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fashionHealth concerns and 'pornified' perceptions have made women more conscious at the beach
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Ojo Onaolapo celebrates winning the bronze medal
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Rock band Led Zeppelin in the early 1970s
musicLed Zeppelin to release alternative Stairway To Heaven after 43 years
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High-flyer: Chris Pratt in 'Guardians of the Galaxy'
filmHe was homeless in Hawaii when he got his big break. Now the comic actor Chris Pratt is Hollywood's new favourite action star
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Van Gaal said that his challenge in taking over Bobby Robson's Barcelona team in 1993 has been easier than the task of resurrecting the current United side
footballA colourful discussion on tactics, the merits of the English footballer and rebuilding Manchester United
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Save the tiger: The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The big cats kept in captivity to perform for paying audiences and then, when dead, their bodies used to fortify wine
A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery all included in top 50 hidden spots in the UK

A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery

Introducing the top 50 hidden spots in Britain
Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

How a disease that has claimed fewer than 2,000 victims in its history has earned a place in the darkest corner of the public's imagination
Chris Pratt: From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

He was homeless in Hawaii when he got his big break. Now the comic actor Chris Pratt is Hollywood's new favourite action star
How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

Broadcasting plays and exhibitions to cinemas is a sure-fire box office smash
Shipping container hotels: Pop-up hotels filling a niche

Pop-up hotels filling a niche

Spending the night in a shipping container doesn't sound appealing, but these mobile crash pads are popping up at the summer's biggest events
Native American headdresses are not fashion accessories

Feather dust-up

A Canadian festival has banned Native American headwear. Haven't we been here before?
Boris Johnson's war on diesel

Boris Johnson's war on diesel

11m cars here run on diesel. It's seen as a greener alternative to unleaded petrol. So why is London's mayor on a crusade against the black pump?
5 best waterproof cameras

Splash and flash: 5 best waterproof cameras

Don't let water stop you taking snaps with one of these machines that will take you from the sand to meters deep
Louis van Gaal interview: Manchester United manager discusses tactics and rebuilding after the David Moyes era

Louis van Gaal interview

Manchester United manager discusses tactics and rebuilding after the David Moyes era
Will Gore: The goodwill shown by fans towards Alastair Cook will evaporate rapidly if India win the series

Will Gore: Outside Edge

The goodwill shown by fans towards Alastair Cook will evaporate rapidly if India win the series
The children were playing in the street with toy guns. The air strikes were tragically real

The air strikes were tragically real

The children were playing in the street with toy guns
Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite – The British, as others see us

Britain as others see us

Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite
How did our legends really begin?

How did our legends really begin?

Applying the theory of evolution to the world's many mythologies
Watch out: Lambrusco is back on the menu

Lambrusco is back on the menu

Naff Seventies corner-shop staple is this year's Aperol Spritz