Arts and Entertainment

The country was the breakaway Republic of Biafra, which seceded from Nigeria in 1967, in response to the continuing persecution of the Igbo people.

LETTERS : Euro pooches

IN HIS profile of Pauline Green ("Labour's other leader", 5 February), Andrew Marshall implies that some Labour MEPs' objection to Tony Blair's desire to abandon Clause IV shows that the party has not lost the ability to shoot itself in the foot. Was it not Mr Blair's action in resurrecting a dead issue that provoked the shooting?

Wednesday morning 11am: back to sleep : Inside Parliament

The word "historic" was much bandied about yesterday as the House of Commons met for the first of its new Wednesday morning sittings. But by 11am, with barely a dozen MPs in the chamber raking over the embers of the Pergau dam affair, "soporific"

IN BRIEF: Peer dies

Lord Kagan, a former confidant of the Labour prime minister Harold Wilson, has died aged 79.

Wilson inherits £800m deficit from Tories

CABINET SECRETS OF 1964: Stephen Ward and Stephen Castle review files n ow in the public domain

Labour and Whitehall mistrusted each other

CABINET SECRETS OF 1964: Stephen Ward and Stephen Castle review files n ow in the public domain

Troops Threat

THE CABINET CRISIS OF 1964

Radical who lost his way

Keith Joseph, who died on Saturday, earned his niche in history by his role in his party's transition from post-1945 one-nation Toryism to Thatcherism, which he launched almost unawares.

Leading Article: Bold, but Blair must also be brave

THIS WAS probably a historic speech. Since John Smith's death last May, Tony Blair has wooed not just his party but the nation. Yesterday when he declared, 'We are the mainstream voice in politics today', it was only a mild exaggeration.

The sad passing of the naked exhibitionist: Keith Elliott charts the rise and demise of the streakers

WHO remembers streakers? Twenty years ago, a young window-dresser from Kingston upon Thames called Sally Cooper streaked across Kingston bridge with four friends. Her streak, and the arrest that followed, won her brief media fame. It also earned her a bite on the bottom from an eager police dog. But, apart from the occasional sports enthusiast, streakers have now disappeared.

View from City Road: The business of being different

Not for the first time, the two voices of British business, the Confederation of British Industry and the Institute of Directors, are at loggerheads. The CBI supports Michael Heseltine in the cabinet row about state support for business. The IoD is behind Michael Portillo.

Letter: Modern Rachmans still prosper on the poor

Sir: Thank you for your interesting, if grim, feature ('Life in a house of horrors', 16 July) highlighting the present-day struggle between leaseholders and their landlords.

Leading Article: Blair must find Wilson's fire

THE election of Tony Blair as Labour's 14th leader marks a turning point for the party. It is not only of symbolic importance that all Labour members, not just union barons and individual activists, have had the right to a direct vote in the choice of their leader. The practical effect of this more democratic procedure has been enormous. Without John Smith's one-member, one-vote reform, the likelihood of Mr Blair or anybody of his ilk achieving Labour's top job would have been negligible.

MI5 says 80% of terror plots foiled: Director-General gives Dimbleby lecture

THE SECURITY services foil 80 per cent of terrorist attacks attempted in Northern Ireland, Stella Rimington, the Director-General of MI5, said in a BBC television lecture last night. She disclosed that MI5 dedicates nearly half its resources to tackling Irish terrorism.

TELEVISION / Confident Sharpe enlists the ridiculous

PLAYING Napoleon can't be good for a man. In Sharpe (ITV), Ron Cook brushed his hair over his forehead and peered up from the bottom half of the screen, like a man straining to look over a fence. Someone called Ducos was telling him what to do next in the Peninsular War, which may have explained why he was hissing like a malfunctioning Ascot. Ducos wanted to reorder the course of European diplomacy in order to take his revenge on Major Sharpe. Napoleon said yes.

Monstrous theft

Screaming Lord Sutch, leader of the Monster Raving Loony Party, appealed for the return of his top hat, stolen while he was playing a rock gig at the Conservative club at Barry Island, South Wales. He first wore it when he stood against Harold Wilson in 1963.
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
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Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project
Diana Krall: The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai

Diana Krall interview

The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai
Pinstriped for action: A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter

Pinstriped for action

A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter
Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: 'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'

Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: How we met

'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef serves up his favourite Japanese dishes

Bill Granger's Japanese recipes

Stock up on mirin, soy and miso and you have the makings of everyday Japanese cuisine