Arts and Entertainment

The country was the breakaway Republic of Biafra, which seceded from Nigeria in 1967, in response to the continuing persecution of the Igbo people.

LETTERS : Euro pooches

IN HIS profile of Pauline Green ("Labour's other leader", 5 February), Andrew Marshall implies that some Labour MEPs' objection to Tony Blair's desire to abandon Clause IV shows that the party has not lost the ability to shoot itself in the foot. Was it not Mr Blair's action in resurrecting a dead issue that provoked the shooting?

Wednesday morning 11am: back to sleep : Inside Parliament

The word "historic" was much bandied about yesterday as the House of Commons met for the first of its new Wednesday morning sittings. But by 11am, with barely a dozen MPs in the chamber raking over the embers of the Pergau dam affair, "soporific"

IN BRIEF: Peer dies

Lord Kagan, a former confidant of the Labour prime minister Harold Wilson, has died aged 79.

Wilson inherits £800m deficit from Tories

CABINET SECRETS OF 1964: Stephen Ward and Stephen Castle review files n ow in the public domain

Labour and Whitehall mistrusted each other

CABINET SECRETS OF 1964: Stephen Ward and Stephen Castle review files n ow in the public domain

Troops Threat

THE CABINET CRISIS OF 1964

Radical who lost his way

Keith Joseph, who died on Saturday, earned his niche in history by his role in his party's transition from post-1945 one-nation Toryism to Thatcherism, which he launched almost unawares.

Leading Article: Bold, but Blair must also be brave

THIS WAS probably a historic speech. Since John Smith's death last May, Tony Blair has wooed not just his party but the nation. Yesterday when he declared, 'We are the mainstream voice in politics today', it was only a mild exaggeration.

The sad passing of the naked exhibitionist: Keith Elliott charts the rise and demise of the streakers

WHO remembers streakers? Twenty years ago, a young window-dresser from Kingston upon Thames called Sally Cooper streaked across Kingston bridge with four friends. Her streak, and the arrest that followed, won her brief media fame. It also earned her a bite on the bottom from an eager police dog. But, apart from the occasional sports enthusiast, streakers have now disappeared.

View from City Road: The business of being different

Not for the first time, the two voices of British business, the Confederation of British Industry and the Institute of Directors, are at loggerheads. The CBI supports Michael Heseltine in the cabinet row about state support for business. The IoD is behind Michael Portillo.

Letter: Modern Rachmans still prosper on the poor

Sir: Thank you for your interesting, if grim, feature ('Life in a house of horrors', 16 July) highlighting the present-day struggle between leaseholders and their landlords.

Leading Article: Blair must find Wilson's fire

THE election of Tony Blair as Labour's 14th leader marks a turning point for the party. It is not only of symbolic importance that all Labour members, not just union barons and individual activists, have had the right to a direct vote in the choice of their leader. The practical effect of this more democratic procedure has been enormous. Without John Smith's one-member, one-vote reform, the likelihood of Mr Blair or anybody of his ilk achieving Labour's top job would have been negligible.

MI5 says 80% of terror plots foiled: Director-General gives Dimbleby lecture

THE SECURITY services foil 80 per cent of terrorist attacks attempted in Northern Ireland, Stella Rimington, the Director-General of MI5, said in a BBC television lecture last night. She disclosed that MI5 dedicates nearly half its resources to tackling Irish terrorism.

TELEVISION / Confident Sharpe enlists the ridiculous

PLAYING Napoleon can't be good for a man. In Sharpe (ITV), Ron Cook brushed his hair over his forehead and peered up from the bottom half of the screen, like a man straining to look over a fence. Someone called Ducos was telling him what to do next in the Peninsular War, which may have explained why he was hissing like a malfunctioning Ascot. Ducos wanted to reorder the course of European diplomacy in order to take his revenge on Major Sharpe. Napoleon said yes.

Monstrous theft

Screaming Lord Sutch, leader of the Monster Raving Loony Party, appealed for the return of his top hat, stolen while he was playing a rock gig at the Conservative club at Barry Island, South Wales. He first wore it when he stood against Harold Wilson in 1963.
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?