Arts and Entertainment

The country was the breakaway Republic of Biafra, which seceded from Nigeria in 1967, in response to the continuing persecution of the Igbo people.

Open Eye: Letter: Catching up - at a price?

I have a particular interest in the article "looking for ways to help lads catch up" by Yvonne Cook (Open Eye, October), both because of personal experience and concern for the way in which this might be done - perhaps a return to discrimination against girls and not just complacency about girls as the article suggests.

The Saturday Profile: Lord Jenkins of Hillhead, om - The master code-breaker

Roy Jenkins spent much of the last war as a code-breaker at Bletchley Park, seeking to decipher top secret German signals. It was the most frustrating mental experience of his life, he says: "Particularly as the act of trying almost physically hurt one's brain, which became distinctly raw if it was not relieved by the catharsis of achievement."

Gray's Inn

The following have been elected Masters of the Bench of the Honourable Society of Gray's Inn:

Patten considers return to Commons

CHRIS PATTEN, the former Tory party chairman who masterminded his party's 1992 General Election victory but lost his own seat, has indicated that he would be willing to return to the Commons next year.

Joan Lestor dies, aged 66

BARONESS Lestor of Eccles - the former Labour MP Joan Lestor - died yesterday in a London hospice following an illness.

Obituary: Marjorie Wilson

IT IS difficult to be the male spouse of a leading lady politician. I suspect it is no less difficult being the big sister of a Prime Minister. Marjorie Wilson succeeded in being a lady of considerable worth in her own right. After studying Chemistry at Leeds University, she became a teacher, later moving to Cornwall, where she spent many years as headmistress of St Blazey's Infants School and, from 1966 to 1971, of Biscovey Infants School.

Cool Britannia leaves me cold

POWER? COOL. First, you need a balcony and a bunch of people. You stand on the balcony and turn them into a crowd by continuously repeating slogans at them. Then you can insult them, threaten them, treat them like naughty children, and they will still love you. Why will they still love you? Because you turned them into a crowd.

Cool Britannia begins to go cold on 'bogus' Blair

Has Cool Britannia turned its back on Blair? A leading style guru has dismissed Labour's attempts to schmooze with the glitterati, while one of Britain's leading theatrical figures has again attacked Labour for not supporting the arts. Fran Abrams and David Lister report on dissent among those whom Blair would like to call his own.

There is an eerie void behind the politicians behind the Dome

I don't suppose many now people remember the name of Bernard Hollowood, who was editor of Punch after Malcolm Muggeridge. Well, I don't suppose many people were aware of him then, and I wouldn't have been aware of him either if he had not been editor of Punch at the time I joined the staff, and as he was my boss, it seemed only tactful to be aware of him.

Secret papers: Alliances and arms deals show flexible morality

According to Labour Foreign Secretary George Brown in 1967, it was not "morally acceptable" to condemn the Americans over their involvement in Vietnam. It was, however, morally acceptable to use the Royal Air Force secretly to deliver ammunition to the Israelis on the eve of the Six Day War and to make careful calibrations of the kind of weaponry it was acceptable to supply to the Nigerian military junta for use in the bloody suppression of a revolt by its eastern region, or Biafra as it became known to the world.

Secret papers: Pay-TV

Secret papers: Pay-TV

Secret papers: Bitter wrangle over that pound in your pocket

Some of the bitterest wrangling during 1967, within the Cabinet but more especially between the Government and its officials, concerned the need to devalue the pound.

City & Business: Shaping for the future

Corporate restructuring continues to sweep the country. On Monday Vickers announced the sale of Rolls Royce because it lacks the capital to compete in a market dominated by integrated auto makers. On Wednesday, Pilkington announced it was cutting 6,000 jobs and taking a charge of pounds 200m in an effort to secure its good, but shaky, position in the world glass business.

Obituary: Jimmy McGinley

Albeit they had had a good result the year before in the by-election at Glasgow Bridgeton, it was the 9,750 votes in the by-election in West Lothian in May 1962 that launched the resurgence of the Scottish National Party. (Dr Robert McIntyre, the then SNP chairman, had represented Motherwell for a fleeting period at the end of the Second World War.)
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 30 January 2015
Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee