Arts and Entertainment

The country was the breakaway Republic of Biafra, which seceded from Nigeria in 1967, in response to the continuing persecution of the Igbo people.

Loyalists, not traitors get their reward from Major

John Major today exacts his revenge against Norman Lamont, by excluding his former Chancellor from the resignation honours list, in which the former Prime Minister reward friends ranging from Cabinet ministers to his private car driver.

Obituray: Sir Kenneth Lewis

Had Parliamentary Question Time been televised during the 28 years, 1959-87, that Kenneth Lewis was a Member of the House of Commons, I do not doubt that he would have established a national reputation as a "character". He was always direct, usually provocative, sometimes witty, and, it has to be said, occasionally utterly ridiculous. And, as the prospect for ministerial office for which he craved waned, he became more and more irreverent towards his front bench.

THE LORDS OF THE UNDERWORLD

Anyone who needs reminding how effortlessly corruption can occur in the highest - as well as the lowest - reaches of society and politics should watch next week's `Secret Lives' documentary. Startling new evidence, presented here for the first time by the Kray twins' official biographer, shows that an extraordinary establishment cover-up resulted in London's most notorious villains being given the freedom of the city. Thanks to what took place, the Krays became `untouchables', who over four long years were allowed to create the most elaborate crime ring this country has ever seen. More than 30 years on, the true story of Lord Boothby and the Krays can finally be told - it is a

Letter: The secret of Houdini Harold

Sir: Thank you for the parallels between Tony Blair and Harold Wilson ("The cautionary tale of Labour's last moderniser", 4 June). There are others. If Harold Wilson boxed himself in with an overvalued exchange rate, Tony Blair has boxed himself in by yielding up both of government's main levers on the economy: interest rates to the Bank of England; and taxation to his promises to our much more materialistic electorate.

Clinton to repeat Cabinet history

There is very little that is new under the sun, and yesterday's excited reports of President Bill Clinton addressing the Cabinet, and Baroness Thatcher being called in to advise Tony Blair were quickly put into proportion by the precedents.

Upstairs, downstairs

The staff at No 10 are there to oil the wheels of state for the new Prime Minister and his wife, but what will they do for Tony and Cherie, working parents?

The who's who of Blair's top team

The territory isn't uncharted, but the maps are pretty moth-eaten. If Labour wins tonight, Tony Blair will be only the second Labour leader since Clement Attlee to win a general election. And unlike either Harold Wilson or Attlee he will know nothing of Cabinet government from the inside. Yet by the end of tomorrow he will have laid down the essential building blocks of an administration likely, if the polls are anything to go by, to last well into the next century.

Letter: Most of us want higher taxes

You argue that Tony Blair's strategy of politics of the centre deserves to be taken seriously ("Maybe Labour really means it", 20 April). Indeed it does, particularly because it is an extension of the idea of trying to make Labour the natural party of government that Harold Wilson pushed in the 1960s. There is only one problem, demonstrated by the Essex firefighters' dispute. Everyone can agree that cutting firefighters' jobs puts lives at risk. However, the problem then arises as to where the money is to be found to stop the cuts. To hold the centre you need the votes of a substantial section of right-wing voters. They, however, are unlikely to support the idea of taxing the rich, even if it is for a reasonable purpose.

Election '97: It's a fight to the death

Blair lets rip as his poll lead slips; 'The election will be the last fought on ideology and politics as well' - Tony Blair yesterday

Election '97: HOW I WILL VOTE: BERNARD MANNING

Sleaze is no laughing matter but nor is it overly worrying

How to get ahead in election advertising, part one

Graham Hinton, chairman of the Bates Dorland advertising agency, rates the campaign ads of the week.

Scottish sceptics won over by Blair

Tony Blair appealed to a suspicious Scottish Labour Party Conference yesterday to "have faith in New Labour" and work for a government that would "make a difference" to the lives of everyone.

Books: Polonius or Pollyanna

HOW TO BE A MINISTER by Gerald Kaufman, Faber pounds 8.99

House game of baiting the Beast for telling the truth

It is small wonder that the Prime Minister runs so far ahead of his party in popular estimation. With a few notable exceptions, he is not only seems nicer than most of his colleagues, but funnier too. There is a part of John Major's psyche that sips rum-punches in calm, warm lands - whereas his desperate, fractious friends live year round in a region of cold winds and barren hills, where dog eats dog.

Blair's busy day: Hard Labour for New Labour - with Old Labour memories

Top: Tony Blair arriving at the Methodist Central Hall in Westminster yesterday morning for the launch of a campaign by NCH Action for Children to end youth homelessness. Right: Addressing the British Screen Advisory Council at the Mansion House, with Lord Attenborough, the Lord Mayor, Roger Cork, the widow of the former Labour leader Harold Wilson, Lady Mary Wilson, Michael Deeley, deputy chairman of the council and Wilson's former secretary, Lady Falkender. Below: Being grilled at the Mansion House, watched by his press secretary Alastair Campbell. Left: With Lord Attenborough
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War with Isis: Iraq declares victory in the battle for Tikrit - but militants make make ominous advances in neighbouring Syria's capital

War with Isis

Iraq declares victory in the battle for Tikrit - but militants make make ominous advances in neighbouring Syria
Scientists develop mechanical spring-loaded leg brace to improve walking

A spring in your step?

Scientists develop mechanical leg brace to help take a load off
Peter Ackroyd on Alfred Hitchcock: How London shaped the director's art and obsessions

Peter Ackroyd on Alfred Hitchcock

Ackroyd has devoted his literary career to chronicling the capital and its characters. He tells John Walsh why he chose the master of suspense as his latest subject
Ryan Reynolds interview: The actor is branching out with Nazi art-theft drama Woman in Gold

Ryan Reynolds branches out in Woman in Gold

For every box-office smash in Ryan Reynolds' Hollywood career, there's always been a misconceived let-down. It's time for a rethink and a reboot, the actor tells James Mottram
Why Robin Williams safeguarded himself against a morbid trend in advertising

Stars safeguard against morbid advertising

As film-makers and advertisers make increasing posthumous use of celebrities' images, some stars are finding new ways of ensuring that they rest in peace
The UK horticulture industry is facing a skills crisis - but Great Dixter aims to change all that

UK horticulture industry facing skills crisis

Great Dixter manor house in East Sussex is encouraging people to work in the industry by offering three scholarships a year to students, as well as generous placements
Hack Circus aims to turn the rule-abiding approach of TED talks on its head

Hack Circus: Technology, art and learning

Hack Circus aims to turn the rule-abiding approach of TED talks on its head. Rhodri Marsden meets mistress of ceremonies Leila Johnston
Sevenoaks is split over much-delayed decision on controversial grammar school annexe

Sevenoaks split over grammar school annexe

If Weald of Kent Grammar School is given the go-ahead for an annexe in leafy Sevenoaks, it will be the first selective state school to open in 50 years
10 best compact cameras

A look through the lens: 10 best compact cameras

If your smartphone won’t quite cut it, it’s time to invest in a new portable gadget
Paul Scholes column: Ross Barkley played well against Italy but he must build on that. His time to step up and seize that England No 10 shirt is now

Paul Scholes column

Ross Barkley played well against Italy but he must build on that. His time to step up and seize that England No 10 shirt is now
Why Michael Carrick is still proving an enigma for England

Why Carrick is still proving an enigma for England

Manchester United's talented midfielder has played international football for almost 14 years yet, frustratingly, has won only 32 caps, says Sam Wallace
Tracey Neville: The netball coach who is just as busy as her brothers, Gary and Phil

Tracey Neville is just as busy as her brothers, Gary and Phil

The former player on how she is finding time to coach both Manchester Thunder in the Superleague and England in this year's World Cup
General Election 2015: The masterminds behind the scenes

The masterminds behind the election

How do you get your party leader to embrace a message and then stick to it? By employing these people
Machine Gun America: The amusement park where teenagers go to shoot a huge range of automatic weapons

Machine Gun America

The amusement park where teenagers go to shoot a huge range of automatic weapons
The ethics of pet food: Why are we are so selective in how we show animals our love?

The ethics of pet food

Why are we are so selective in how we show animals our love?