Arts and Entertainment

The country was the breakaway Republic of Biafra, which seceded from Nigeria in 1967, in response to the continuing persecution of the Igbo people.

Sir Humphrey savours final taste of power

DIANE COYLE

Moment of harmony as LSO chief wins pipesmoker award

Sir Colin Davis, the internationally acclaimed conductor, yesterday became the 32nd Pipesmoker of the Year. The London Symphony Orchestra chief, 68, who started smoking "out of boredom" 50 years ago, was presented with the award at the Savoy Hotel, in central London.

Marcia's battle for official respect

JOHN RENTOUL

Records show 30 years of the 30-year rule

Papers released today under the 30-year rule include Harold Wilson's proposal, agreed by the Cabinet on 5 August 1965, to bring in the 30-year rule itself. The Prime Minister suggested that the new administration should take a step towards more open government by cutting the previous 50-year embargo on most official papers.

Mountbatten's secret role in 'propaganda war'

What posture should the Queen's cousin adopt if he met the rebel leader? Prime Minister's suggested answer: "Bow stiffly and condescendingly and treat as a private person," writes John Crossland.

How Wilson planned to invade Rhodesia

JOHN RENTOUL

Eighteen months to go....

In 1992, Labour got high on the scent of victory, and blew it. Usually they don't even get close. That was then. As their poll lead over the Tories grows ever more massive, Tony Blair's new model army marches forward, straight, stern and purposeful. This time, he says, there will be no mistake. He nips front bench trouble in the bud, his henchmen police the press. In this report, John Rentoul, political correspondent of The Independent and author of a biography of Tony Blair, examines the psychology of the leader and explains how it suffuses the party he leads

He represented all that was best in his generation . . . everyone trusted him

Lord Home of the Hirsel - better known as Sir Alec Douglas-Home - the only Prime Minister this century to be drawn from the House of Lords, died yesterday at his estate in the Borders aged 92.

Signals that were there for all to see

THE HOWARTH DEFECTION: The moral question: Government attitudes towards social issues proved to be decisive in the dramatic move to Labour;

Hattersley the rebel smarts from Blunkett's savaging

LABOUR IN BRIGHTON

Obituary: Sir James Jones

"Harold [Wilson] has bloody well stitched me up," Dick Crossman fumed on the night of Monday 9 May 1966. Or as a calmer, less angry, Crossman put it, writing his weekly diary on Sunday for Tuesday 10 May:

Wilson aide Lord Lever dies at 81

Lord Lever, a Labour Cabinet minister and economic adviser to former Prime Ministers Harold Wilson and James Callaghan, died at his home in London yesterday. He was 81.

Blair: quite a year, quite a few questions

Tony Blair has just completed his first year as leader of the Labour Party. By any standards, it has been a remarkable performance. In twelve short months he has become the nodal figure in British politics. He has transformed the electoral prospects of his party; he is well on the way to revolutionising Labour's culture; he has shifted its policy axis through at least 45 degrees; he has transformed millions of people's perception of Labour and what it stands for; and he has made himself and his political themes the centre of gravity of the political scene. It is difficult to think of another modern British political leader who has made such an impact in so short a space of time: perhaps Harold Wilson; certainly not Margaret Thatcher.

Cabinet tilts to the left in reshuffle

Heseltine wins post of deputy

TORY LEADERSHIP ELECTION: Is this the most political street in Britain?

Chris Blackhurst goes behind the closed doors of Lord North Street, whe re Michael Portillo has set up his campaign headquarters
Career Services

Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Israel-Gaza conflict: No victory for Israel despite weeks of death and devastation

Robert Fisk: No victory for Israel despite weeks of devastation

Palestinians have won: they are still in Gaza, and Hamas is still there
Mary Beard writes character reference for Twitter troll who called her a 'slut'

Unlikely friends: Mary Beard and the troll who called her a ‘filthy old slut’

The Cambridge University classicist even wrote the student a character reference
America’s new apartheid: Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone

America’s new apartheid

Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone
Amazon is buying Twitch for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?

What is the appeal of Twitch?

Amazon is buying the video-game-themed online streaming site for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?
Tip-tapping typewriters, ripe pongs and slides in the office: Bosses are inventing surprising ways of making us work harder

How bosses are making us work harder

As it is revealed that one newspaper office pumps out the sound of typewriters to increase productivity, Gillian Orr explores the other devices designed to motivate staff
Manufacturers are struggling to keep up with the resurgence in vinyl records

Hard pressed: Resurgence in vinyl records

As the resurgence in vinyl records continues, manufacturers and their outdated machinery are struggling to keep up with the demand
Tony Jordan: 'I turned down the chance to research Charles Dickens for a TV series nine times ... then I found a kindred spirit'

A tale of two writers

Offered the chance to research Charles Dickens for a TV series, Tony Jordan turned it down. Nine times. The man behind EastEnders and Life on Mars didn’t feel right for the job. Finally, he gave in - and found an unexpected kindred spirit
Could a later start to the school day be the most useful educational reform of all?

Should pupils get a lie in?

Doctors want a later start to the school day so that pupils can sleep later. Not because teenagers are lazy, explains Simon Usborne - it's all down to their circadian rhythms
Prepare for Jewish jokes – as Jewish comedians get their own festival

Prepare for Jewish jokes...

... as Jewish comedians get their own festival
SJ Watson: 'I still can't quite believe that Before I Go to Sleep started in my head'

A dream come true for SJ Watson

Watson was working part time in the NHS when his debut novel, Before I Go to Sleep, became a bestseller. Now it's a Hollywood movie, too. Here he recalls the whirlwind journey from children’s ward to A-list film set
10 best cycling bags for commuters

10 best cycling bags for commuters

Gear up for next week’s National Cycle to Work day with one of these practical backpacks and messenger bags
Paul Scholes: Three at the back isn’t working yet but given time I’m hopeful Louis van Gaal can rebuild Manchester United

Paul Scholes column

Three at the back isn’t working yet but given time I’m hopeful Louis van Gaal can rebuild Manchester United
Kate Bush, Hammersmith Apollo music review: A preamble, then a coup de théâtre - and suddenly the long wait felt worth it

Kate Bush shows a voice untroubled by time

A preamble, then a coup de théâtre - and suddenly the long wait felt worth it
Robot sheepdog technology could be used to save people from burning buildings

The science of herding is cracked

Mathematical model would allow robots to be programmed to control crowds and save people from burning buildings
Tyrant: Is the world ready for a Middle Eastern 'Dallas'?

This tyrant doesn’t rule

It’s billed as a Middle Eastern ‘Dallas’, so why does Fox’s new drama have a white British star?