Arts and Entertainment

Where are you now and what can you see?

I’m at the BBC recording Front Row and apparently I’m looking at a brass bust of Henry Wood. The statue is in the foyer.

<p>1. Night Thoughts by Robert Fraser</p>
<p>£30, oup.com</p>
<p>Colourful biography of the English surrealist poet David Gascoyne. Fabulous.</p>

The 10 Best new biographies

From Banksy and Putin to two men who ran across America

Even a big-budget film starring Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara could not help The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo to the top of the digital charts

How a man with a stethoscope beat the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

Confessions of a GP surprisingly beats crime thriller as biggest selling digital book of the year

Tall tales for tots or teens: The year's best books for young readers

My Day: Bathtime (Orchard, £4.99) is a board book that looks tough enough to survive even in the bath itself. Illustrated by Alex Ayliffe, its final page includes a small mirror, perfect for all self-admiring babies. Yawn (Walker, £9.99) follows on nicely, with a text by Sally Symes and pictures by Nick Sharratt concentrating on one massive yawn, pictured on each page by a large hole. Read in the evening, it will surely drop a none too subtle hint that sleep is the next logical stage. But perhaps not before a few shared nursery rhymes from The Cat and the Fiddle (Frances Lincoln, £12.99). Illustrated by Jackie Morris, this is the latest in a line of beautifully produced anthologies stretching back to the days of Kate Greenaway.

Dunmore says: 'We'd all like to think we were grand fictional characters but probably it's our absurdities which are the most characteristic things about us'

One Minute With: Helen Dunmore, novelist

Where are you now and what can you see?

One Minute With: Louisa Young, novelist

Where are you now and what can you see?

Page-turners: If it's not death, it's Life, in this year's best commercial reads

Books Of The Year: This year's crop of top-selling fiction stars heroes, villains – and even bankers – in stories that will have you reading until the fire burns down

EU investigates Apple and five publishers over e-book pricing

European regulators have launched an investigation into some of the biggest names in publishing to discover whether, with the help of Apple, they have flouted competition rules over the pricing of electronic books.

Ready To Wear: There may well be more to a dress than meets the eye

I love a fashion book divided into easily assimilated, bite-sized chunks.

Jane Fonda as Barbarella in 1968

How women are winning sci-fi's battle of the sexes

Say farewell to the Barbarella stereotype as rise in female authors drags genre into 21st century

No one expects the Spanish Inquisition

The beauty of teen fiction for this Easter holiday is its effortlessness in smuggling in learning

'Wild Things' writer makes a comeback

Maurice Sendak, the creator of Where the Wild Things Are, is to publish his first work as author-illustrator for 30 years.

Stieg Larsson's publisher hits record profits

The success of Stieg Larsson's Millennium Trilogy drove UK publisher Quercus to record results in 2010, allowing the company to announce its maiden dividend.

Tom Sutcliffe: Whose art is it anyway?

The week in culture

Judge reveals reasons behind Stig ruling

A judge today announced his reasons for refusing to ban a book disclosing that Top Gear's The Stig is Ben Collins.

HarperCollins secures Agatha Christie publishing rights

It is almost 85 years since the relationship between Agatha Christie and Collins publishers began with The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, one of the author's earliest and most famous works.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 20 February 2015
Homeless Veterans campaign: Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after £300,000 gift from Lloyds Bank

Homeless Veterans campaign

Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after huge gift from Lloyds Bank
Flight MH370 a year on: Lost without a trace – but the search goes on

Lost without a trace

But, a year on, the search continues for Flight MH370
Germany's spymasters left red-faced after thieves break into brand new secret service HQ and steal taps

Germany's spy HQ springs a leak

Thieves break into new €1.5bn complex... to steal taps
International Women's Day 2015: Celebrating the whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

Whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

Simone de Beauvoir's seminal feminist polemic, 'The Second Sex', has been published in short-form for International Women's Day
Mark Zuckerberg’s hiring policy might suit him – but it wouldn’t work for me

Mark Zuckerberg’s hiring policy might suit him – but it wouldn’t work for me

Why would I want to employ someone I’d be happy to have as my boss, asks Simon Kelner
Confessions of a planespotter: With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent

Confessions of a planespotter

With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent. Sam Masters explains the appeal
Russia's gulag museum 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities

Russia's gulag museum

Ministry of Culture-run site 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities
The big fresh food con: Alarming truth behind the chocolate muffin that won't decay

The big fresh food con

Joanna Blythman reveals the alarming truth behind the chocolate muffin that won't decay
Virginia Ironside was my landlady: What is it like to live with an agony aunt on call 24/7?

Virginia Ironside was my landlady

Tim Willis reveals what it's like to live with an agony aunt on call 24/7
Paris Fashion Week 2015: The wit and wisdom of Manish Arora's exercise in high camp

Paris Fashion Week 2015

The wit and wisdom of Manish Arora's exercise in high camp
8 best workout DVDs

8 best workout DVDs

If your 'New Year new you' regime hasn’t lasted beyond February, why not try working out from home?
Paul Scholes column: I don't believe Jonny Evans was spitting at Papiss Cissé. It was a reflex. But what the Newcastle striker did next was horrible

Paul Scholes column

I don't believe Evans was spitting at Cissé. It was a reflex. But what the Newcastle striker did next was horrible
Miguel Layun interview: From the Azteca to Vicarage Road with a million followers

From the Azteca to Vicarage Road with a million followers

Miguel Layun is a star in Mexico where he was criticised for leaving to join Watford. But he says he sees the bigger picture
Frank Warren column: Amir Khan ready to meet winner of Floyd Mayweather v Manny Pacquiao

Khan ready to meet winner of Mayweather v Pacquiao

The Bolton fighter is unlikely to take on Kell Brook with two superstar opponents on the horizon, says Frank Warren
War with Isis: Iraq's government fights to win back Tikrit from militants - but then what?

Baghdad fights to win back Tikrit from Isis – but then what?

Patrick Cockburn reports from Kirkuk on a conflict which sectarianism has made intractable