Life and Style Darth Vader takes a selfie but gets the technique slightly wrong...

The popular franchise is attempting to engage with younger fans of the series

True Gripes: Blade runner: Get the knives out for the tinkers

The man at the door was very personable, very friendly and very helpful. He was Tony of Tony and Paul's Grinding Service and was calling to see if I would like anything sharpened.

The man with the golden pen: Lawrence Kasdan

Lawrence Kasdan is best known as the director of 'Body Heat' and 'The BigChill'. But he has also written some of the biggest box-office hits of alltime. In an extract from 'Projections 3', he talks to Graham Fuller about 'The Bodyguard', 'Raiders' and 'The Empire Strikes Back'; while (panel, right) Quentin Curtis looks back at a prolific career

BOOK REVIEW / Avenge this foul and almost natural murder: 'A Simple Plan' - Scott Smith: Doubleday, 9.99 pounds

JUST suppose, for the sake of argument, that you found a crashed plane in the middle of nowhere containing nothing but a dead pilot and dollars 4.4m in used dollars 100 bills. Would you at least entertain the possibility of hanging on to the money? Sure you would. You might conclude that keeping the cash was bound to lead to trouble sooner or later from some quarter or other, because whoever had lost the dollars 4.4m was going to miss it very badly indeed. But maybe . . . You could always give it back, after all.

CINEMA / Disgusted, rural Texas: The real star of 'The Fugitive' is Tommy Lee Jones. David Thomson studies his style

HOW important is Tommy Lee Jones to The Fugitive? Well, first of all, he carries himself with the insolent, I-dare-you-tosmile briskness that knows he's in a piece of expensive nonsense and doesn't mean to be caught loitering. If it jolts you to consider that this knock-out, clean-up entertainment is nonsense, think of it in this light: one of Chicago's top doctors comes home to find his wife being murdered by a one-armed man; he is himself accused of the killing; in court, due process and the best lawyers cannot keep Doc from the slammer; but once he escapes from prison it proves surprisingly easy for even a harassed loner to establish his innocence - after all, one-arm still lives in Chicago, and he got his false arm from the doctor's own hospital. The Fugitive may be Hollywood's most flagrant defaming of the American legal profession.

Letter: Misguided patriot games

Sir: Paul Howell (Sports Letters, 18 February) raises a wider issue than the inspirational effect of what he describes as the 'English anthem'. The question that should be addressed is not about the musical qualities of the piece, but about England's right to assume the anthem of the Union as their own. Is it that the English, as a nation, have no particular identity other than as an element of the United Kingdom? As for the team outfits sported by many English representative sides: can someone explain why they include blue? Surely the governing bodies of football and rugby union are not claiming English ownership of the Union flag? If they are, then the blue represents the Scottish element of that Union and therefore has no place on an English team kit.

CINEMA / Harrison at the waxworks

WE ALL know about the British film industry, covered in mould and left at the back of the larder. But who's to blame? The government, the producers, the film schools, the morose legion of screenwriters? Hey, here's a new one: how about Britain? It isn't her worst failing, or her most important one, but really the old girl simply doesn't look the part. She's fine on television, but point a movie camera at her and she goes all coy. America was the cradle of cinema, and those early cries seem to have battered the landscape into the right format; the cities grew up, and upwards, into a mythology woven for them by the movies, and still wear it like a good suit to pose for Hollywood's photographs. England shies away; America says cheese.

INTERVIEW / Covert operations: Kevin Jackson talks to Phillip Noyce about taking on the James Bond of the Nineties in Patriot Games

Helicopters dart low across the sand dunes, their air-to-ground missiles are primed, the order to attack is given. This, a climactic moment in Patriot Games, has - to put it in the most kindly way - a familiar look. We've all seen such preludes to slaughter before in films from Apocalypse Now to Rambo III, and we know exactly what we're in for next: the deafening whine and crash of high explosives, limp khaki bodies hurled into the air like broken dolls, yells of agony and buckets of blood.
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