Life and Style Darth Vader takes a selfie but gets the technique slightly wrong...

The popular franchise is attempting to engage with younger fans of the series

True Gripes: Blade runner: Get the knives out for the tinkers

The man at the door was very personable, very friendly and very helpful. He was Tony of Tony and Paul's Grinding Service and was calling to see if I would like anything sharpened.

The man with the golden pen: Lawrence Kasdan

Lawrence Kasdan is best known as the director of 'Body Heat' and 'The BigChill'. But he has also written some of the biggest box-office hits of alltime. In an extract from 'Projections 3', he talks to Graham Fuller about 'The Bodyguard', 'Raiders' and 'The Empire Strikes Back'; while (panel, right) Quentin Curtis looks back at a prolific career

BOOK REVIEW / Avenge this foul and almost natural murder: 'A Simple Plan' - Scott Smith: Doubleday, 9.99 pounds

JUST suppose, for the sake of argument, that you found a crashed plane in the middle of nowhere containing nothing but a dead pilot and dollars 4.4m in used dollars 100 bills. Would you at least entertain the possibility of hanging on to the money? Sure you would. You might conclude that keeping the cash was bound to lead to trouble sooner or later from some quarter or other, because whoever had lost the dollars 4.4m was going to miss it very badly indeed. But maybe . . . You could always give it back, after all.

CINEMA / Disgusted, rural Texas: The real star of 'The Fugitive' is Tommy Lee Jones. David Thomson studies his style

HOW important is Tommy Lee Jones to The Fugitive? Well, first of all, he carries himself with the insolent, I-dare-you-tosmile briskness that knows he's in a piece of expensive nonsense and doesn't mean to be caught loitering. If it jolts you to consider that this knock-out, clean-up entertainment is nonsense, think of it in this light: one of Chicago's top doctors comes home to find his wife being murdered by a one-armed man; he is himself accused of the killing; in court, due process and the best lawyers cannot keep Doc from the slammer; but once he escapes from prison it proves surprisingly easy for even a harassed loner to establish his innocence - after all, one-arm still lives in Chicago, and he got his false arm from the doctor's own hospital. The Fugitive may be Hollywood's most flagrant defaming of the American legal profession.

Letter: Misguided patriot games

Sir: Paul Howell (Sports Letters, 18 February) raises a wider issue than the inspirational effect of what he describes as the 'English anthem'. The question that should be addressed is not about the musical qualities of the piece, but about England's right to assume the anthem of the Union as their own. Is it that the English, as a nation, have no particular identity other than as an element of the United Kingdom? As for the team outfits sported by many English representative sides: can someone explain why they include blue? Surely the governing bodies of football and rugby union are not claiming English ownership of the Union flag? If they are, then the blue represents the Scottish element of that Union and therefore has no place on an English team kit.

CINEMA / Harrison at the waxworks

WE ALL know about the British film industry, covered in mould and left at the back of the larder. But who's to blame? The government, the producers, the film schools, the morose legion of screenwriters? Hey, here's a new one: how about Britain? It isn't her worst failing, or her most important one, but really the old girl simply doesn't look the part. She's fine on television, but point a movie camera at her and she goes all coy. America was the cradle of cinema, and those early cries seem to have battered the landscape into the right format; the cities grew up, and upwards, into a mythology woven for them by the movies, and still wear it like a good suit to pose for Hollywood's photographs. England shies away; America says cheese.

INTERVIEW / Covert operations: Kevin Jackson talks to Phillip Noyce about taking on the James Bond of the Nineties in Patriot Games

Helicopters dart low across the sand dunes, their air-to-ground missiles are primed, the order to attack is given. This, a climactic moment in Patriot Games, has - to put it in the most kindly way - a familiar look. We've all seen such preludes to slaughter before in films from Apocalypse Now to Rambo III, and we know exactly what we're in for next: the deafening whine and crash of high explosives, limp khaki bodies hurled into the air like broken dolls, yells of agony and buckets of blood.
News
A 1930 image of the Karl Albrecht Spiritousen and Lebensmittel shop, Essen. The shop was opened by Karl and Theo Albrecht’s mother; the brothers later founded Aldi
people
Arts and Entertainment
Standing the test of time: Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd in 'Back to the Future'
filmA cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Arts and Entertainment
Flora Spencer-Longhurst as Lavinia, William Houston as Titus Andronicus and Dyfan Dwyfor as Lucius
theatreThe Shakespeare play that proved too much for more than 100 people
News
exclusivePunk icon Viv Albertine on Sid Vicious, complacent white men, and why free love led to rape
Arts and Entertainment
Stir crazy: Noel Fielding in 'Luxury Comedy 2: Tales from Painted Hawaii'
comedyAs ‘Luxury Comedy’ returns, Noel Fielding on why mainstream success scares him and what the future holds for 'The Boosh'
Life and Style
Flow chart: Karl Landsteiner discovered blood types in 1900, yet scientists have still not come up with an explanation for their existence
lifeAll of us have one. Yet even now, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Arts and Entertainment
'Weird Al' Yankovic, or Alfred Matthew, at the 2014 Los Angeles Film Festival Screening of
musicHis latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do our experts think he’s missed out?
Sport
New Real Madrid signing James Rodríguez with club president Florentino Perez
sportColombian World Cup star completes £63m move to Spain
Travel
Hotel Tour d’Auvergne in Paris launches pay-what-you-want
travelIt seems fraught with financial risk, but the policy has its benefits
Arts and Entertainment
booksThe best children's books for this summer
Career Services

Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy': A land of the outright bizarre

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic's latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do The Independent’s experts think he’s missed out?
Can Secret Cinema sell 80,000 'Back to the Future' tickets?

The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
Why do we have blood types?

Are you my type?

All of us have one but probably never wondered why. Yet even now, a century after blood types were discovered, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Honesty box hotels: You decide how much you pay

Honesty box hotels

Five hotels in Paris now allow guests to pay only what they think their stay was worth. It seems fraught with financial risk, but the honesty policy has its benefit
Commonwealth Games 2014: Why weight of pressure rests easy on Michael Jamieson’s shoulders

Michael Jamieson: Why weight of pressure rests easy on his shoulders

The Scottish swimmer is ready for ‘the biggest race of my life’ at the Commonwealth Games
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn