Party members pass judgement on Redwood

From Miss Lois Blythe

SPORTS LETTER : Power-play paradigm

From Mr Lewis Eckett

Rugby League: Sell-outs at next two Tests

The second and third John Smith's Tests, at Old Trafford and Elland Road, have completely sold out within days of Great Britain's victory over Australia at Wembley.

Help for students

Midland Bank, in conjunction with Ucas, is sponsoring Students' Money Matters, a book that gives students independent guidance on funding their course, work experience, and budgeting. It is published by Trotman & Co, costs pounds 7.95 and is available from bookshops. Free copies will be available at the main freshers' fairs and to the first 250 readers who write to Lee Dooley, Midland Bank Plc, Customer Information Service, PO Box 757, Freepost, Hemel Hempstead, HP2 4BR.

Capital Gains; I want to take you higher

Okay. It's my birthday. It's six in the evening and I'm standing in a cow-pat riddled field in the Chilterns with my mum and brother, both of whom are beaming. Before me is my birthday balloon.

Basketball: Panthers' pace knocks spots off Leopards

THE PANTHERS outpaced the Leopards at the Doncaster Dome last night when the new London franchise paid for failing to obtain work permits for their American imports and lost 65-55 on the opening weekend of the Budweiser League season, writes Duncan Hooper.

BOOK REVIEW / The venerable art of moving mountains: The complete landscape designs and gardens of Geoffrey Jellicoe by Michael Spens, Thames and Hudson pounds 36

LANDSCAPE architecture as a profession began in the 20th century but, as the century ends, many people still have only the vaguest notion of what landscape architects actually do. Enlightenment is at hand in a book celebrating the work of Geoffrey Jellicoe, internationally recognised as the foremost landscape architect of his time, who has designed sites covering several square miles, like the Hope Cement Works in Derbyshire, as well as gardens of great subtlety and intimacy, such as Sutton Place and Shute House. Illustrated with his own sensitive colour drawings and numerous photographs, it records a continuing career that spans six decades.

Travel: British Rail in the wrong sort of holes

BRITISH RAIL grows ever more determined to deter potential customers. The latest Guide to InterCity Services has pre-punched Filofax holes. These perforations imbue rail travel with fresh unpredictability, because they have been punched through the middle of the schedules.

Burglar jailed

A businessman was jailed for five years at the Old Bailey after being convicted of burgling a hotel and subjecting a woman guest to a sex ordeal. The court was told Dennis Adams, 36, a car dealer from Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire, had kept keys from rooms he stayed in and had used them to burgle the hotel twice previously.

Hotel sex attack

A businessman was jailed for five years at the Old Bailey for burgling a hotel and subjecting a woman guest to a sex ordeal. The court was told Dennis Adams, 36, from Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire, had kept keys from rooms he stayed in and had used them to burgle the hotel twice previously.

Basketball: Dismissals bring game to standstill

HEMEL HEMPSTEAD'S Budweiser League game with Birmingham Bullets on Saturday night came close to being abandoned by the referee Keith D'Wan when the Royals' Mike Carty refused to leave the court after being disqualified.

TRAVEL / Riders on the dry slopes: Two feet, one snowboard, no experience. Hester Lacey prepares for the piste

'HAVE you ever skied? Surfed? Skateboarded?' asked the snowboard instructor, Steve Davis. (Snowboarding is a hybrid of all three: American surfers first tore the fins off their boards in the Sixties, looking for new thrills in the snow; modern boards look like large skateboards with no wheels.) No relevant experience at all, I had to confess when I turned up for my lesson at the Hemel Hempstead dry ski slope.

Health: Sisters are doing it for themselves: Why shouldn't a nurse tend a cut finger? Stephen Ward reports on a new unit where accident patients don't have to see a doctor

Daniel Warren, aged 11, sits with his mother in a hospital waiting room. He cut his finger with a Stanley knife while doing woodwork at school. Now his finger is wrapped in a blood-soaked bandage and he waits nervously for attention.

Quality Management: Seat of benchmarking unveiled: Firms in Britain that wish to test whether they are using best practices can take advantage of a new centre

BENCHMARKING is already well established in the United States but is proving increasingly popular on this side of the Atlantic as a means of implementing best practices by the selection of a successful operation as a model against which to measure others.

Suicide doctor faced seven complaints: Councillor in Westminster housing scandal also had professional worries. Christian Wolmar reports

THE FORMER councillor who committed suicide because of the inquiry into his role in the Westminster homes-for-votes scandal faced seven serious complaints arising from his work as a doctor.
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Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Charlie Austin: Queens Park Rangers striker says ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

Charlie Austin: ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

After hitting 18 goals in the Premier League last season, the QPR striker was the great non-deal of transfer deadline day. But he says he'd preferred another shot at promotion
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones