News Iain Duncan Smith blamed civil servants for not giving him the full picture of teething problems of universal credit

Iain Duncan Smith has suggested being on benefits is a form of slavery and he is like abolitionist William Wilberforce through his introduction of welfare reforms.

Welfare reforms clear Parliament

Prime Minister David Cameron has hailed "an historic step in the biggest welfare revolution in over 60 years" after the Government's controversial reforms cleared Parliament.

Anger over marriage tax breaks

George Osborne has infuriated Tory MPs by reportedly ruling out tax breaks for married couples in the Budget.

James Crombie, 41, lives with wife Jenny, 34, in Liverpool. Has four children, Samantha, 20, Jade, 19, Faye, nine, and Alfie, five

Benefits Britain: What should a right-minded member of society think?

The Work and Pensions Secretary, Iain Duncan Smith, wants to break the nation's dependency culture and to encourage the long-term unemployed back into the jobs market. But is this just targeting the less well off to cut the bill to the taxpayer or does he have a point?

Iain Duncan Smith: Fairness for the taxpayer – and for the claimant

Government hands out £200bn per year but ends up trapping people on benefits

Duncan Smith to offer Welfare Bill concessions

Families affected by the government's £26,000 welfare cap will be given at least nine months to adapt to the loss of benefits, under concessions to be outlined by the Government.

A series of senior union leaders lined up last week to warn of the repercussions for the party's relations with the union movement after Mr Miliband said he would not reverse the Government's public sector pay freeze.

Mary Ann Sieghart: Fairness that Miliband can't see

In case anyone was wondering whether the Government's proposed benefits cap was unfair, yesterday's Sunday Times helpfully came up with a Somali family, who have never worked, living in a six-bedroomed house in West Hampstead at public expense. Their house is worth £2m, which means that if Vince Cable has his way, they'll be claiming mansion tax benefit next.

New plan to boost corporate giving

Charities would reap an extra £1 billion a year under think-tank proposals unveiled today to "turbocharge" corporate giving.

Leading article: Resolving the euro crisis must be the PM's priority

Britain's best interests are not served by being pushed to the sidelines in Europe

Iain Duncan Smith as called for a referendum on the proposed new EU fiscal union

Silence at the back! PM overrules Tory sceptics

David Cameron provoked a backlash from Conservative Eurosceptics yesterday by ruling out both a referendum on Europe and a major drive to grab back powers from Brussels.

Lord Hutton urges swift pensions deal

The government's controversial reforms to public sector pensions may not be enough to bring costs under control, former work and pensions secretary Lord Hutton has warned.

On the button: 'World at One' host Martha Kearney

The Week In Radio: Still the No 1 news show for a new world order

There's a certain type of listener that organises their day around what's on the radio. The Today programme might haul them out of bed on a weekday morning and see them through breakfast and ablutions, while lunch might be accompanied by Jeremy Vine declaiming about cuckolding vicars. For me, Friday evenings aren't complete without a glass of wine and the sound of Jonathan Dimbleby on Any Questions quietly banging his head on the desk at being called David for the 874th time.

Europe 'could cost Tories the next election'

Rebellious Tory MPs were warned yesterday by a former deputy party chairman that they could cost the Conservatives victory at the next general election unless they got the subject of Europe "into proportion".

Ministers clash over rival plans to tackle gangs

The all-out war that David Cameron promised to wage on gangs after the August riots is threatening to turn into one between government departments.

I predicted a riot: City sage who saw there was trouble ahead

Tom Peck speaks to a financier with a recipe for mending Broken Britain

Britain in 'last-chance saloon' over society warns Iain Duncan Smith

Britain is in "the last-chance saloon" to solve the social problems behind the riots, Iain Duncan Smith has said.

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Sun, sex and an anthropological study

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From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

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This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

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Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

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Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

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Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
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Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

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