Arts and Entertainment

Where are you now and what can you see?

I’m at the BBC recording Front Row and apparently I’m looking at a brass bust of Henry Wood. The statue is in the foyer.

The week in radio: Never mind the lows, the highs are cosmic

As autumn arrives, with its swirling winds battering our dark and chilly mornings, it is once more open season for attacks on Radio 4. The old chestnuts are unearthed, steeped in vinegar and given a spin in ritual combat. Thursday's much-leaked RAJAR statistics discern a sharp fall in listening figures and the pundits are quick to condemn, blaming uncomfortable schedules, over-reliance on focus-groups and mistaken allocation of funds. Some wail that the network is debased by idiot quiz shows while others find it boring, inaccessible and stodgy. Dumbed down or lectured up, all agree that it is definitely not what it was.

Much binding in the Guildhall

The six novels shortlisted for the Booker Prize have been specially bound by an elite squad of bookbinders.

Bus driver shortlisted for Booker

First-time writer gives established novelists run for their money in big literary prize

Chris Smith attacks 'elitist' Booker

CHRIS SMITH wants a new populist literary award to be established because he believes the Booker Prize is "too elitist".

Reading Review: Short but not sweet

Martin Amis

Have you heard the one about the oriental fantasy?

Jack O'Sullivan on the identikit booker shortlist

Arts: Booker list continues an Indian love affair

The shortlist for the Booker Prize, fiction's premier award, was announced yesterday. Big-name novelists such as Ian McEwan and Jeanette Winterson have failed to make the last six, but, as David Lister reports, for debut novelist Arundhati Roy, it is a dream come true.

Book review / Spilt personalities

Enduring Love by Ian McEwan, Jonathan Cape, pounds 15.99

WAYS WITH WORDS AT DARTINGTON HALL: 11-20 JULY

IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE INDEPENDENT ON SUNDAY

Books: Ways With Words literature festival

The Ways with Words literature festival at Dartington Hall in South Devon offers nine varied days of literary events in one of the country's most beautiful settings. Between 11 and 20 July, from 10am to 10pm each day, the medieval Great Hall and courtyard will be the venue for talks debates, readings and interviews. Among more than 200 writers taking part this year will be Ian McEwan, Jung Chang, Mary Wesley, Louis de Bernieres, Anthony Clare, Rose Tremain, Kate Adie, Marina Warner, Roy Strong and the Independent's Polly Toynbee and Suzanne Moore.

The Week on Radio: Dark visions of Utopia

Considering that it's meant to be an ideal state, Utopia has a terrible image. When you label something or somebody Utopian, you don't usually mean it as a compliment - as a rule, what you're getting at is that it's either hopelessly optimistic or unavoidably authoritarian. So the challenge Michael O'Donnell sets his guests on Utopia and Other Destinations (Radio 4, Saturday), in which they are asked to expound their personal vision of the ideal state, is to find a place that sits somewhere between those two poles - to design a version of Nowhere that might be Somewhere we would want to live.

Girls will be girls

GUT SYMMETRIES by Jeanette Winterson, Granta pounds 15.99

Letter: Solidarity with Turkish writers

Solidarity with

Theatre; Duchess of Malfi Wyndhams, London

The Duchess of Malfi is one of the more frequently performed non- Shakespearian tragedies in the English repertoire. Indeed, the Wyndhams Theatre has now played host to Webster's drama twice in the one year. "I am Duchess of Malfi still" - "Yes, and don't we know it, dear," you're tempted to respond as, for the umpteenth time, you award her the Mrs Miniver trophy for stoic fortitude.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY KEATS

John Keats was born on 31 October 1795, and to celebrate the bicentennial there's a wreath-laying ceremony in Westminster Abbey (Keats was only admitted into the pantheon in the 1950s!) with readings by Victoria Glendinning, Ian McEwan, Michele Roberts and Keats biographer Andrew Motion (6pm, 31 Oct, details 0171 976 0983).
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Isis in Syria: A general reveals the lack of communication with the US - and his country's awkward relationship with their allies-by-default

A Syrian general speaks

A senior officer of Bashar al-Assad’s regime talks to Robert Fisk about his army’s brutal struggle with Isis, in a dirty war whose challenges include widespread atrocities
‘A bit of a shock...’ Cambridge economist with Glasgow roots becomes Zambia’s acting President

‘A bit of a shock...’ Economist with Glasgow roots becomes Zambia’s acting President

Guy Scott's predecessor, Michael Sata, died in a London hospital this week after a lengthy illness
Fall of the Berlin Wall: History catches up with Erich Honecker - the East German leader who praised the Iron Curtain and claimed it prevented a Third World War

Fall of the Berlin Wall

History catches up with Erich Honecker - the East German leader who praised the Iron Curtain and claimed it prevented a Third World War
How to turn your mobile phone into easy money

Turn your mobile phone into easy money

There are 90 million unused mobiles in the UK, which would be worth £7bn if we cashed them in, says David Crookes
Independent writers remember their Saturday jobs:

Independent writers remember their Saturday jobs

"I have never regarded anything I have done in "the media" as a proper job"
Lyricist Richard Thomas shares his 11-step recipe for creating a hit West End musical

11-step recipe for creating a West End hit

Richard Thomas, the lyricist behind the Jerry Springer and Anna Nicole Smith operas, explains how Bob Dylan, 'Breaking Bad' and even Noam Chomsky inspired his songbook for the new musical 'Made in Dagenham'
Tonke Dragt's The Letter for the King has finally been translated into English ... 50 years on

Buried treasure: The Letter for the King

The coming-of-age tale about a boy and his mission to save a mythical kingdom has sold a million copies since it was written by an eccentric Dutchwoman in 1962. Yet until last year, no one had read it in English
Can instilling a sense of entrepreneurship in pupils have a positive effect on their learning?

The school that means business

Richard Garner heads to Lancashire, where developing the 'dragons' of the future is also helping one community academy to achieve its educational goals
10 best tablets

The world in your pocket: 10 best tablets

They’re thin, they’re light, you can use them for work on the move or keeping entertained
Lutz Pfannenstiel: The goalkeeper who gave up Bayern Munich for the Crazy Gang, Bradford and a whirlwind trawl across continents

Lutz Pfannenstiel interview

The goalkeeper who gave up Bayern Munich for the Crazy Gang, Bradford and a whirlwind trawl across continents
Pete Jenson: Popular Jürgen Klopp can reignite Borussia Dortmund’s season with visit to Bayern Munich

Pete Jenson's a Different League

Popular Klopp can reignite Dortmund’s season with visit to Bayern
John Cantlie video proves that Isis expects victory in Kobani

Cantlie video proves that Isis expects victory in Kobani

The use of the British hostage demonstrates once again the militants' skill and originality in conducting a propaganda war, says Patrick Cockburn
The killer instinct: The man who helps students spot potential murderers

The killer instinct

Phil Chalmers travels the US warning students how to spot possible future murderers, but can his contentious methods really stop the bloodshed?
Clothing the gap: A new exhibition celebrates women who stood apart from the fashion herd

Clothing the gap

A new exhibition celebrates women who stood apart from the fashion herd
Fall of the Berlin Wall: Goodbye to all that - the lost world beyond the Iron Curtain

The Fall of the Berlin Wall

Goodbye to all that - the lost world beyond the Iron Curtain