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Willie Walsh got a new job this month: the Irish government hired the British Airways supremo as chairman of advisers to its state debt agency. And the latest evidence of the impact of Mr Walsh’s drastic cost-cutting at International Airlines Group (IAG) suggests the Irish couldn’t have found a better person for the job.

World's end: A journey to Spain's wild western edge

The pilgrim route through Galicia ends at glorious Santiago de Compostela – but travel further and you'll be amazed by Spain's very own Land's End

Primark delivers 'stunning' sales

Primark, the discount fashion retailer, has posted recession-defying sales in its second half, and vowed to press ahead with its store opening programme.

Simon Calder: Gimme gimme gimme...a meal after 10am

Can you hear the drums? While British Airways battles on in what its chief executive calls a "fight for survival", the airline's misfortunes are chiming with the songbook of Sweden's only supergroup.

Fasten your seat belts, turbulence ahead

Threats of industrial action, disappearing passengers and swine flu - BA faces a dark summer says Richard Northedge

I feel your pain, says BA boss giving up a month's pay (£61k)

When Willie Walsh, the ruthless boss of British Airways, decides that he needs to make a self-sacrificing gesture, the rest of his staff know it is time to fasten their safety belts and grab the sick bags. There is turbulence ahead for the world's favourite airline.

Set sail and see three European countries in eight days

You don't have to go to the Caribbean to try a cruise. Ian White took a short break around the coasts of France, Portugal and Spain

Just how cheap are those no-frills flights once the hidden extras are taken on board?

Budget carriers are seeking new and ever more imaginative ways of charging for 'extras'. As the price of 'low-cost' air travel mounts, Mark Rowe looks at how bargain seekers are being brought down to earth with a bump

BA freezes pay and looks for job cuts after £70m loss

Airline hit by collapse in premium traffic and the decline of the pound

Weak pound deepens BA’s woes

Flag carrier warns of £150m loss for the full year

Family travel: 'Where can we see wild turtle hatchlings?'

Q. Our family would love to see turtle hatchlings in the wild. Do you have any idea of how far and when we would have to travel to be guaranteed to see them? We don't want there to be only "a good chance" of seeing them. L Baxter, via email

Setback for BA as Qantas merger talks are grounded

Airlines fail to agree on stakes in combined group

Market Report: HSBC hit as 'safe haven' status is questioned

The banking giant HSBC was on the back foot again last night as speculation about its capital base refused to go away. The banking giant retreated to 625.25p – down 6.96 per cent or 46.75p – amid persistent concerns that it might have to fall in line with its peers and raise capital or, alternatively, reduce its dividend to conserve cash.

BA in talks with Qantas to create global super-airline

British Airways (BA) is in talks with Qantas, the Australian flag-carrier, about a merger that could help create one of the next generation of global super-airlines.

Jeremy Warner: British Airways adds Qantas to list of marriage partners

Outlook That two-timing Willie Walsh, chief executive of British Airways, has been playing the field again. Not content with his ongoing courtship of Spain's Iberia, or even his on-off affair with American Airlines on revenue, sales and cost-sharing, he's also been sweet-talking the Australian carrier Qantas, though you must please understand that it wasn't any part of Mr Walsh's doing. It was apparently Qantas that made the approach. What can a man do when such an attractive-looking Sheila throws herself at your feet?

Jeremy Warner: O'Leary back for a second bite at Aer Lingus

Outlook: If at first you don't succeed ... Michael O'Leary, the pugnacious boss of Ryanair, thinks conditions in the airline industry have deteriorated so much in the two years since he last took a tilt at Aer Lingus that now he's bidding at half the price he did back then, the competition authorities in Europe will be only too happy to wave him through.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
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