Tuesday's Book: The Fateful Question of Culture by Geoffrey H Hartman, Columbia University Press, pounds 17.95

In the Great British Debate about culture since the rise of mass literacy, we have come to expect certain things: swooping mandarin ironies, raillery, much self-protective humour, jokes about soap-operas, Keats versus Dylan and furious protest activity at the perimeter fence supposed to divide high from low culture.

Science: The end is nigh ... but not for a while

The universe is getting bigger - and nothing is ever, ever going to stop it. It's good news, as long as you don't mind the lights going out 100 billion years from now, says Charles Arthur.

Education: Warning over student fees

Universities were yesterday given a blunt warning not to try to supplement their income by charging students top-up fees.

Yale looks pink dollar gift horse in the mouth

Yale University, the quintessentially Ivy League crucible of American academe, rarely objects to offers of money from generous benefactors. It pauses, however, when the dollars involved come in a bright shade of pink.

Letter: Inequity of 'Ivy League'

Your views

Tiny machines will be able to build themselves

How do you build a micro-machine whose components are thousands of times smaller than a pinhead? The answer, according to American scientists, is that you don't - you let them build themselves.

Letter: How America pays for research

Sir: Your education editor, Judith Judd, wrote of a movement towards what she described as "American-style" funding for research in UK universities ("New funds bring on a British Ivy League", 25 January), a style whereby "the Ivy League colleges receive proportionally far more research money than less prestigious institutions". From an American perspective, may I make two points?

New funds bring on a British Ivy League

Elite universities in Britain are moving closer to an American-style Ivy League, after government advisers decided to give them their biggest ever share of research funds.

Ancient spires dream a new Ivy League

Universities should be remodelled on the American system with Oxford and Cambridge, Durham and London forming an elite Ivy League, the Secretary of State for Education believes.

opera Madame Butterfly Grand Theatre, Leeds

An opera in which under-age sex leaves a 15-year-old girl a single parent? You wouldn't want sensitive opera-goers exposed to that sort of thing, would you? No wonder Opera North performs Madame Butterfly in Italian with no surtitles. Offer the punters no translation, and they just might miss the sordid details.

OBITUARY : E. Digby Baltzell

The serendipitous invention of the word Wasp, denoting not the yellow-and-black striped insect, vespula vulgaris, but a White Anglo-Saxon Protestant, has changed perceptions of American society and even American history. The world owes it to an eminent sociologist at the University of Pennsylvania with the magnificently appropriate Wasp name of E. Digby Baltzell. Not all his friends and students knew that the E. stood for Edward.

We must grasp the nettle of university reform

Hundreds of thousands of children will be condemned to second- class degrees - in more ways than one. So say the alarmists who fear a new split in the higher education system. Only years after the old division between polytechnics and universities was finally abolished, academics are now worried about a new hierarchy in higher education: an Ivy League of the top British universities, followed by everyone else.

TRIED & TESTED : FAVOURITE FLINGS

King Frisbee's long reign is over. Our experts launch it among its rivals to discover which is the highest flyer

Yale nude `posture' photos destroyed : Briefly

New Haven, Connecticut - The Smithsonian Institution has destroyed nude photographs taken decades ago of Yale University students who were unaware the pictures were used to advance a since-discredited science.

Even the wife of the President of the United States sometime had to stand naked

How America's best and brightest posed nude in the cause of pseudo-science. Here is the New York Times story that startled a nation.
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Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee