News

Investors complain about ‘lack of visibility’ around bonus scheme for directors

Stephen Glover: What are the chances for the country's first quality freesheet?

The news that the London Evening Standard is to be given away free from next Monday is mind-boggling. It will be the first time any publisher in this country has offered readers what is, after all, a pretty good newspaper for nothing. All existing freesheets are fairly downmarket, and do not have any pretensions to be complete newspapers.

Johann Hari: If we care about the BBC, we must fight to defend it

The Tories' plan to scrap impartiality would mean Sky mutating into Fox News

How Cameron cosied up to Murdoch & Son

The Sun's decision to turn against Labour was the reward for years of shrewd politicking and social networking by the Tory leader and his team. Andy McSmith reports

Bradshaw's warning to the BBC: you must change to survive

Culture Secretary issues tough message as high-profile MPs wade into the Marr row

Mark Thompson: Public space: so scorned yet so vital

James Murdoch sees the world in black and white. The reality in Britain is very different

BBC chief hits out at 'political interference'

The BBC director general, Mark Thompson, has hit back at the Culture Secretary Ben Bradshaw's calls to scrap the BBC Trust, the corporation's governing body, describing it as "frankly puzzling" political interference.

Final outing for thelondonpaper

The evening freesheet thelondonpaper will appear on the capital's streets for the last time tomorrow.

Christopher Bland: Review the BBC but don't destroy it

Forcing it to charge for online services would only lead to a switch to other free providers

Tim Luckhurst: BBC must realise that competitors are not enemies

Sir Michael Lyons's letter to BBC licence fee payers reveals deplorable thinking in a corporation that is determined to have its cake and eat it. Encouraged by a survey that reveals the obvious, i.e. that Britons are proud of the BBC, he presents an argument so self-interested it appears cynical.

The BBC backlash: Thompson hits out at Murdoch

Following a stinging attack from the head of News Corporation last month, the BBC yesterday promised a 'radical review'. But before a pen had been lifted, director general Mark Thompson had emailed all his staff branding his chief critic 'hopelessly out of touch'. Ian Burrell reports

BBC to review whether it should become smaller

Mark Thompson, the BBC director general, is to oversee a "thorough review" into whether the corporation is "the right size" and what areas it should concentrate its resources on in future.

Letters: Elected Lords

Who would stand for election to the Lords?

Murdoch Jr vs the man from Auntie: Sparks fly over BBC online

Robert Peston leaps to defence of the broadcaster's web services after News Corp attack, while Tories refuse to rule out forcing it to charge for sites

Leading article: The BBC's unhealthy dominance

When James Murdoch accepted the invitation to deliver the MacTaggart lecture at this year's Edinburgh International Television Festival, one thing was certain: like his father before him, he would have the BBC in his sights. And so he did. Twenty years after Rupert Murdoch used the same platform to depict, with uncanny accuracy, the broadcasting landscape of the future, James Murdoch attacked the BBC's continuing domination in, if anything, even more forthright terms. He spoke of a "chilling" advance, which "threatens the provision of news in Britain".

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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine