Arts and Entertainment Face values: Paul from Channel 4’s ‘My Tattoo Addiction’

Roll up, roll up! See the tattooed man with no job and £71 a week to support his whole family

Could `Fergie' be the Sue Lawley of tomorrow?

The BBC has been secretly schooling the Duchess of York as a chat show host and will shortly announce that she is to have her own radio series.

Theatre: Comedy of mannerisms

THEATRE Lady Windermere's Fan Theatre Royal, London

ETCETERA : HOW WE MET JULIAN CLARY AND BARB JUNGR

Julian Clary, 37, grew up in Teddington. He began working the cabaret circuit with his dog, Fanny, as the Joan Collins Fan Club. His TV shows include Sticky Moments, Terry and Julian and the recent BBC2 series All Rise For Julian Clary. He is soon to start work on a TV series for American audiences. He lives in London.

Do you know who I am?

The fiercest dress code outside a nudist club awaits those who win the coveted badge to the Royal Enclosure at Ascot.

Nuisance caller: barnets, starlets and old dogs

"Hi. I'd like to book an appointment with Nicky Clarke. Do you do hair relaxing?"

What's in a name? Your queries answered

Ever wondered exactly what the derivation of your name is, or of the strangely named people around you? Dr Vernon Monicker, an expert on the etymology of names, is back again to answer your questions. All yours, Doctor!

Knocking them dead with pleasure

A 33-year-old Illinois prodigy in a bandanna is America's newest literary sensation. Edward Helmore reports

VANITY POETS TAKE ARMS AGAINST A SEA OF TROUBLES

Michael Leapman on the latest literary row post Miss Collins

Novel victory for La Collins in her finest role ever

Joan Collins sauntered away last night from her breach-of-contract court battle with Random House, her former publisher, with her her wallet and honour restored, and with her face back where she likes it: on the front pages.

Sighs and scattiness as Joan steals court drama's final act

Taking the stand one last time in the courtroom confrontation with Random House, her former publisher, Joan Collins was all pumped up. Even her hair-do, a swirl of raven-black armour, had a formidable quality that had not been there before.

Write or wrong, proof may be danger to fiction

THE NEW YORK publishing community has died and gone to Court TV heaven. At any rate, it might as well be dead for all the work that got done last week; from one end of Manhattan to the other, editors, proof- readers and literary agents sat gaping at Channel 51.

Collins novels `were fixable', court hears

Joan Collins had no need for the Kleenex yesterday in her court battle with Random House as experts defended her claim that she fulfilled a multi-million-dollar book contract signed with the company five years ago.

Poor old Joan

Joan Collins ain't Shakespeare. She is a rich writer of poor stories. Her books are not bought for their lucid examinations of the dark night of the human soul, nor for their grand evocations of time and place. But in the mid and late Eighties, when Dallas and Dynasty ruled the airwaves, they sold.

I've spent advance, says defiant Collins

JAMES CUSICK
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