News 25 students have been arrested in California following an undercover police operation which echoes the plot of 21 Jump Street, a Hollywood film in which Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum play young police officers who pose as high school pupils

In events that echo TV series and film 21 Jump Street, officers in California posed as high school students to make the drug related arrests

Such a sweet transvestite

Adam Mars-Jones applauds Tim Burton's affectionate tribute to Ed Wood, the worst director in Hollywood history

Who's a pretty boy then?

Johnny Depp is. But maybe he's too gorgeous for his own good. John Lyttle on the star of Don Juan DeMarco and Ed Wood

Wood-tinted glass

You can thank Tim Burton for the latest bloody Ed Wood revival. He's gone and made a biopic of the (too) much celebrated "worst director of all time". Called simply Ed Wood, it opens on 26 May and stars Johnny Depp as the man with a surfeit of enthusiasm and angora sweaters (he openly indulged his transvestism) but a distinct absence of talent. Unfortunately, Burton brings us no closer to either the man or the movies, but then that isn't what the fans are after. They want kitsch, kooks and sets that wobble in a light breeze. You'll get plenty of all that in the NFT's season, Ed Wood Jr: King (and sometimes Queen) of the Mad Mad Bs, now in its second week. Tonight, you can sample his most notorious work, Plan 9 From Outer Space (above), one of three Wood films featuring a washed-up Bela Lugosi. But the question is: will you stay to the end? Wood is a phenomenon that everyone likes to namecheck but you'll be hard pressed to find someone who has stuck one of his films out to the bitter end. Frankly, I'd rather strut through Battersea in pink angora than endure Bride of the Monster, which features Lugosi wrestling an inanimate rubber octopus. But then maybe I'm just weird.

Son of Dracula

Bela Lugosi Jr wants to place a curse on Tim Burton for misrepresenting his father in Ed Wood. Paul Duane reports

Dear Goatee Wearers

Face facts - your feeble sproutings make you look neither mean nor moody, but more like Shaggy from Scooby Doo. And women deserve better than partners who look like the Head Gremlin

John Lyttle in cinema

Johnny Depp is unusual. Not because he's part Cherokee (so are Johnny Cash, Burt Reynolds, James Garner and Cher), not because he dated Winona Ryder - that's a liability, not an asset - and not because he's yet another teen TV star to make it in movies. No, Johnny Depp is unusual because he's so damn pretty, and guys who are that pretty Hollywood usually typecasts and burns out fast.

FILM / Girth, wind and fire: What's Eating Gilbert Grape? (12), Director: Lasse Hallstrom (US); M Butterfly (15), Director: David Cronenberg (US) - Sheila Johnston on Johnny Depp's return journey to Quirksville, USA and David Cronenberg's departure from schlock-horror

What's Eating Gilbert Grape? Well, a dumb name is the least of his problems. He lives, to begin with, in Endora, a hick Mid-West town shamefacedly aware of its own nullity (the shingle of the local pharmacy bears the depressing legend 'ENDora OF THE LINE DRUGS'). His mother (Darlene Cates) weighs in at 600lb and is rooted to the sofa. His kid brother Arnie (Leonardo DiCaprio, the excellent young actor who played Robert De Niro's rebellious son in This Boy's Life, Oscar-nominated for his performance in this film) is mentally handicapped.

Poker: Under the gun with a Dead Man's Hand

WILD BILL HICKOK was shot in the back in a game at Deadwood, South Dakota, holding aces and eights. Ever since, two pairs aces and eights have been known as the Dead Man's Hand.

Fashion: Through a lens backwards: Blow-Up, Antonioni's 1966 film about a fashion photographer, is back. Marion Hume and Tamsin Blanchard talk to the inspired and the inspirers

David Bailey told Marie Helvin he didn't get it; but one of his assistants from those days suggested that he got it all the time. Those are two responses we got when we asked photographers and other fashion people what they thought about Blow-Up. That it was one of the most memorable films about Sixties London there is no doubt; even less that it is the film about fashion then. But whereas British directors made films from the heart of the London myth, Antonioni's was arty and edgy. Not all those cinema-goers who were overcome by Jane Birkin and another nymphet rolling topless in the studio could get their heads round balletic tennis scenes without tennis balls. And not everyone who went for the cars, the funky apartments and the girls noticed the film's ambivalent attitude to its subject. If it was not a film that launched a thousand photographers, it certainly put some thoughts in some minds. Our own Herbie Knott says that were it not for Blow-Up he would have become a lawyer. And photographers now have girlfriend-models of the moment - Mario Sorrenti and Kate Moss are the Bailey and Shrimpton de nos jours (sort of). Certainly, Blow-Up hums with Sixtiesness, which is why it is part of the Barbican fanfare to that decade. Mary Quant, however, found it disappointingly lacking in chic
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