News Twitter user Craig Davies claims to have taken this photo of a hearse at the drive-through of a fast-food restaurant

Twitter user Craig Davies said the driver gave up and moved on to Starbucks

Daniel Howden: In Nairobi, business is booming in the gleaming new branches of KFC

The city's new plazas are full of South African fast-food outlets copying those in the US

KFC must pay £5m to Australian girl left brain damaged by poisoned chicken

KFC has been ordered to pay eight million Australian dollars (£5.1 million) to the family of a Sydney girl left brain damaged after eating one of the fast food giant's chicken wraps.

KFC sorry for tsunami chicken advert

KFC has apologised for a Facebook message that urged people to rush home during yesterday's tsunami scare in Thailand and order a bucket of chicken.

HSBC profits rise 15% to £13.8 billion

HSBC’s global profits have risen to £13.8 billion, a 15 per cent annual rise and one of the healthiest profits ever reported by a British company.

EMMA HARRISON: The A4e boss was awarded contracts worth millions, despite the allegations

Emma Harrison hired despite A4e fraud warning

Job tsar's appointment raises fresh questions over David Cameron's choice of key advisers

Letters: Business and the community

Sir Victor Blank ("Business must start a giving revolution", 24 February) raises a timely issue but does not go far enough.

Extradited Briton in high-security Texas jail

The family of retired businessman Christopher Tappin are due to hear from him today for the first time since he was extradited to Texas on Friday to face charges that he tried to obtain missile parts to sell to Iran.

Simms Taback: Award-winning children's author

Simms Taback was an award-winning children's author and illustrator.

Jens Hofma, chief executive of Pizza Hut in the UK, at one of his restaurants

Jens Hofma: Meet the man who wants to sell a slice of Pizza Hut

He has been leading the restaurant chain's recovery and wants to whet the appetites of buyers for the British division

Last Night's Viewing: The Crusades, BBC2<br />Jonathan Meades on France, BBC4

When James of Vitry, new Bishop of Acre, arrived at his see in 1216, he apparently wasn't terribly impressed. The earlier Christian Crusades had left behind a string of Crusader statelets down the Mediterranean coast and Acre, close to Jerusalem, had become the most important port in the region, a gateway for pilgrims and a centre for trade. Piety it didn't do nearly as well. In fact, Bishop James thought it was all a bit Gomorrah-on-Sea, distressing proof that the ideals of the earlier Christian adventurers had been corrupted by economic power and pragmatic exchange. In the last of his interesting series The Crusades, Thomas Asbridge showed us a rather literal token of this accommodation between theological purpose and day-to-day profit – gold coins minted by the Crusader knights in imitation of Egyptian Islamic originals. When it came to cash they were open to multi-faith dialogue, however intransigent they might be when on their knees praying.

James Moore: Browett should watch his step as he joins big league

Welcome to the corporate Premier League, John Browett. The Dixons Retail boss has been poached by Apple to run its fast-expanding retail operation and shareholders are anything but happy about his departure. The fact that he has more or less kept the show on the road is seen as no small achievement.

James Moore: New Apple boss Browett is in the big league now – but he has to watch his step

Outlook: Welcome to the corporate Premier League, John Browett. The Dixons Retail boss has been poached by Apple to run its fast-expanding retail operation and shareholders are anything but happy about his departure. The fact that he has more or less kept the show on the road is seen as no small achievement.

Yum Brands calls in PwC to sell off its Pizza Huts in the UK

The restaurants giant Yum Brands has appointed an accountancy firm to sell its Pizza Hut UK business.

Simon English: Tesco's American venture hasn't been fresh or easy

There was always a coals-to-Newcastle, fish-to-Iceland feel about Tesco's plan to crack the US supermarket industry. Just on the bare face of it, even if you'd never visited America, you might quickly reach the view, based on what you've read and seen, that these folk are not short of food. Tesco's approach seemed cocky and hubristic, right from the start. They had done research, they said. There were huge gaps in the market. Tesco was going to show those Yanks how to run a proper food business. They'll thank us for it.

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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
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Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
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What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

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The worst kept secret in cinema

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Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
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Honesty box hotels

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Commonwealth Games 2014: Why weight of pressure rests easy on Michael Jamieson’s shoulders

Michael Jamieson: Why weight of pressure rests easy on his shoulders

The Scottish swimmer is ready for ‘the biggest race of my life’ at the Commonwealth Games
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

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Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
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A Bible for billionaires

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Paranoid parenting is on the rise

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Magna Carta Island goes on sale

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The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

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We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

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The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

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