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From campervans and Yorkshire's hidden gems to whales In Mexico and bush retreats in Cairns

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Why The Dreyfus Affair Matters, By Louis Begley

This work from an American lawyer and novelist probes the murky Dreyfus affair and draws parallels with Bush's Guantanamo solution. Begley points out the "analogous restrictions on access, recreation, correspondence, rations" and savage constraints of Devil's Island and Guantanamo.

The magnificent seven: global wildlife highlights

1. There she blows: Whale-watching

It's a heart-stopping moment: a distant spout breaks the horizon and your boat changes course. In the blink of an eye the vast, apparently empty ocean has come alive.

Dig rewrites history of Tasmania's Aborigines

But millions of artefacts discovered at a 40,000-year-old site are at risk from a plan for a new four-lane highway

Cowboy Scott included in Australia team

Matt Scott is the surprise package among the 10 Queenslanders named in Australia's team for the final of the Four Nations on Saturday. The prop from the NRL's bottom club, the North Queensland Cowboys, has been named in the starting line-up against New Zealand in Brisbane in preference to the Kangaroos' most capped forward, Petero Civoniceva.

O'Gara is left ruing luck of the draw

Ireland 21 South Africa 23

Kangaroos take advantage of English mishaps and mistakes

Australia 34 England 14

Pesky Kangaroo who won't be tied down

Lockyer, the nemesis of GB and now England, is still not ready to call it quits

Robinson eager for starting role

Luke Robinson would leap at the chance of starting for England for the first time against Australia on Sunday, but will not complain at being asked to make his contribution from the bench once more.

Tuqiri poised for amazing kangaroo comeback

Winger's colourful journey could come full circle this weekend, writes Dave Hadfield

Mother clamours for fourth 'dingo baby' inquest

There have been three inquests, a trial, two appeals and a royal commission – but the legal saga sparked by the disappearance of Azaria Chamberlain 30 years ago is not yet over. Australian authorities are reportedly planning a fourth inquest, following demands by Azaria’s parents for official recognition of the fact she was taken by a dingo.

'I'm no expert, but...': Superfreakonomics author Stephen J Dubner explains his offbeat approach

He admits that he doesn't have all the answers – but Stephen J Dubner, the journalist 'sidekick' of the 'Freakonomics' duo, tells Emily Dugan he can't wait to put their unconventional theories into practice

Ex-Happy Mondays star Bez 'attacked girlfriend in missing cash row'

Former Happy Mondays star Bez was today convicted of assaulting his ex-girlfriend at their home after a row over money.

Media Diary: Lembit-watchers had advance warning of Laws's downfall

Poignant and depressing though David Laws' resignation on Saturday night certainly was, at least it was less a shock than it might have been. The pre-emptive warning came on Saturday afternoon when a former colleague waded into the debate with a contribution headlined: "Opik: No question of Laws resigning". Ah well – we Lembit-watchers thought on seeing this – that's that for the ascetic member for Yeovil. It was Lembit who insisted Charles Kennedy would survive until the moment he resigned; Lembit who then became Mark Oaten's campaign manager (quite an accolade given that he was the only Lib Dem MP to back him); and Lembit, the seer of seers, who then switched allegiance to Simon Hughes. The sadness is that had Lembit only clung on his Montgomeryshire seat on 6 May he'd have been in line to replace Danny Alexander as Scottish Secretary ... and might from there have replicated the Alexander book by swiftly ascending to Cheek Secretary to the Treasury. But now what for the asteroid paranoiac? Lembit, it seems, has been hired by a gambling syndicate to go through the cards in difficult handicaps. His job, as you may have guessed, will be to tip all but one of the field.

OFT stops inquiry into Project Canvas

The Office of Fair Trading said a joint venture aimed at giving internet access to digital TV falls outside its jurisdiction yesterday, dealing a blow to critics of the venture such as pay-TV firms. Project Canvas plans to bring video on-demand programming without subscription to viewers. Its backers include the BBC, the commercial groups ITV, Channel 4 and Five and the telecoms groups BT and Talk Talk.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent