New Articles Waving and drowning: Nigel Farage’s local council success will not carry through to the next general election

Despite Nigel Farage's prediction that the UK Independence party will cause an “earthquake” in British politics at the European Parliament elections, Britons give Ukip as much chance of winning as finding life on Mars.

French hopes on royal high after Sarafina tour de force

The French are expecting big things at Royal Ascot this week – not least through Goldikova and Makfi tomorrow – and will leave home soil emboldened by a breakthrough yesterday for another new star. Though not yet two months into her career, Sarafina is now an unbeaten Classic winner after leading a one-two for her trainer and owner in the Prix de Diane, the French Oaks, at Chantilly.

Barbecue weather gives way to thunderstorms and rain

Barbecue weather looks set to come to an end as thunderstorms and rain showers set in for the next week, forecasters said today.

Business Diary: Relishing round two of Branson versus Cable

Is Sir Richard Branson's Virgin group still in the running for Northern Rock, the nationalised bank that the Government hopes in the not-too-distant future to sell back to the private sector? If so, the bearded one is going to need to get past Vince Cable, Secretary of State for Business, with whom he has a little form. Only two years ago, the first time Sir Richard had a tilt at buying Northern Rock, Cable questioned in the Commons whether he was a "fit and proper person" to run the bank.

Nature Studies by Michael McCarthy: A quiet man with the eye of a falcon

The natural world has its cult books, as the arts world does or the economics world does, if by a cult book we mean a little-known work with a major mystique among a minority; and for a long time now the cult book for anyone who takes a serious interest in the natural world in Britain has been JA Baker's The Peregrine. Published in 1967, and hardly known, if known at all, by the general public, it is an account of a man who spends a winter in the flatlands of Essex and on the Essex coast, closely observing a pair of peregrine falcons.

Yell chief's resignation is part of a growing trend

Directory group's chief executive and its finance director will step down just months after the company hit shareholders with a £660m cash call

Miliband front-runner in leadership stakes

David Miliband tonight emerged as early favourite to take over from Gordon Brown as the next Labour leader, according to bookmakers.

DJ Taylor: If this election is getting to you, just find a dark room and lie down

Sleepless nights of inner conflict aggravated by severe Cleggmania? You need the soothing ministrations of a Florence Nightingale...

Nevin's Notes (22/04/10)

An alternative take on the election

Sean O'Grady's Best Bets

The Independent's Economics Editor turns to money matters of another kind: how to make a mint out of the election

The City Diary: Sibling rivalry: Life inside Lehman Brothers

Slackbelly exposes The Good, The Bad and The Ugly of The Square Mile

David Prosser: How long-term performance plans became a sure thing

Outlook People say the bookie always comes out on top. Well not if you're Richard Glynn, the new chief executive of Ladbrokes, who has emerged as very much the winner from contract negotiations with his new employer. Though Mr Glynn will receive a relatively modest basic salary of £580,000, less than his predecessor earned, there is naturally a generous bonus scheme on offer. He'll also be handed 1.177 million Ladbrokes shares, worth £1.75m, on arrival at the company as compensation for the "current remuneration and equity interests which he will be required to relinquish the role".

You Write the Caption - 19/03/10

Win a bottle of Champagne

Chris McGrath's Day Three Verdict: Buck's can justify Walsh's biggest hopes by keeping grip on title

Champion stayer set to dominate while Tranquil Sea looks ready to make waves

Chris McGrath: When, not if, Saturday comes...

Inside Track

Nicholls shows strength in depth

Twenty-strong supporting cast to Kauto and Denman lined up for the Festival
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 20 February 2015
Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

Climate change key in Syrian conflict

And it will trigger more war in future
How I outwitted the Gestapo

How I outwitted the Gestapo

My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
The nation's favourite animal revealed

The nation's favourite animal revealed

Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
Is this the way to get young people to vote?

Getting young people to vote

From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn