News Rachael Neustadt with her children, from left, Meir, Jonathan and Daniel

A British-based former teacher embroiled in an international tug-of-love fight with her Russian ex-husband over custody of their two sons has won a “landmark” court ruling in Moscow, lawyers said today.

Pictures of the day: Chile's new pecking order

More than 100 students have held a kiss-in in the Chilean capital Santiago as part of a peaceful protest demanding education reforms.

Labour must boost appeal within M25, warns shadow minister

A poll found 53 per cent of these voters believe party used to care about them, but only 30 per cent think it still does

Gawker vs Fox News: the media battle that divides America

Investigation into TV presenter's private life is latest episode in bitter rivalry

Slump in US consumer confidence fuels QE calls

Consumer confidence in the US is at its lowest ebb since the depths of the credit crisis, according to new figures that gave fresh ammunition to economists who want another round of monetary stimulus from the Federal Reserve.

McQueen's label in talks to bring exhibition home

A campaign appealing to the curators of New York's runaway "Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty" exhibition to bring the show to British shores seemed closer to success yesterday after the design house revealed it was in talks with major venues in London.

Who made me what I am?

Is it genes or upbringing that shapes our characters, talents and traits? As an adopted child, the question has always fascinated Kate Hilpern

School dinner costs warning issued

Children will have to pay up 17% more for their school dinners this year compared to last, a survey has found.

Leading article: An idea worth exploring

The Tory party in the 19th century was pre-eminently the party of those in possession of a good many rolling acres. Matters have evolved since then but it is still not surprising that the party once led by Disraeli and Lord Salisbury is reluctant to countenance even for a second the Liberal Democrat proposal for a new tax on land. The very phrase "land tax" does indeed have an old-fashioned socialist whiff about it, bringing back memories of the Labour programme of 1945. But it would be a shame if that were to become an excuse to dump the idea without even considering it.

<i>IoS</i> letters, emails &amp; online postings (28 August 2011)

The role of central government politicians is to ensure that laws are clear and precise. Police forces have a clear mandate to apply them, free from interference. Once prime ministers, metropolitan mayors or home secretaries believe they are better placed than highly trained police officers to do the job and use their access to the media to make cheap political points, we are on a downward slide.

The secret of my success: How five high-flying graduates made it

Exorbitant university fees, high youth unemployment... Things look bleak for the next generation. What does it take to land a top job in our most elite professions?

In-Flight Entertainment, By Helen Simpson

Helen Simpson's latest collection of short stories - she brings one out every five years - opens on familiar ground. "Up at the Villa" is a blistering account of the trials of early parenthood revealed under too bright a Southern sun. The classic Simpson cast includes a baby, "a furious geranium in its parasol-shaded buggy", its mother, a "large, pale woman sagging about it in her bikini" and the father, "making a great noise with his two-day-old copy of The Times". Watching them are a group of young people who've broken into the garden for a swim, but instead find themselves witness to an ugly marital spat.

Scotland Yard fees protest probe inadequate

The police watchdog has ruled Scotland Yard inadequately investigated officers for using excessive force against a wheelchair-bound student fees protester, his solicitor said today.

East coast of US rocked by 5.8-magnitude earthquake

The capital of the free world has experienced many a man-made shock in recent years: a major terrorist attack, serial sniper murders, an anthrax scare, not to mention a brush with national debt default. Yesterday, though, Washington DC received a rare and jarring shock at the hand of Mother Nature: a 5.8-magnitude earthquake that rattled structures, emptied the Capitol and other office buildings, and crashed mobile phone networks.

Expensive universities to lose student places

Even Oxford and Cambridge will lose students as ministers free up 20,000 places at cheaper universities

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent