News Rachael Neustadt with her children, from left, Meir, Jonathan and Daniel

A British-based former teacher embroiled in an international tug-of-love fight with her Russian ex-husband over custody of their two sons has won a “landmark” court ruling in Moscow, lawyers said today.

Leading article: An ill-judged absence

The clamour for political leaders to curtail their holidays when something goes wrong is a simplistic, knee-jerk response.

Tottenham smoulders after night of rioting

The residents of Tottenham were demanding answers from the police last night amid accusations that too little was done to control London's worst riots in a generation.

Vault, By Ruth Rendell

Ruth Rendell is bidding fair to join Defoe and Dickens in creating one of the great criminal cities of literature. Her view of London is a similar murderous topography, less squalid, but with the same tentacles reaching out between rich and poor. The mapping of this novel began over a decade ago with the publication of her A Sight for Sore Eyes, which featured "Orcadia Cottage", a charming old house in St. John's Wood painted by a well-known artist as a backdrop for his portraits of a devoted young couple.

NOTW boss 'who signed off Mulcaire's fees' is latest to be arrested

Public face of newspaper Stuart Kuttner, now 71, is drawn in to scandal

A picture of peace in Afghanistan – but have the Taliban gone for good?

As the transition process gathers pace, Kim Sengupta reports from Nad-e Ali, Helmand

Leading article: Degrees are not for everybody

It is significant that Mary Curnock Cook, chief executive of Ucas, the University and College Admissions Service, says that many youngsters will have to consider whether their university applications are "strong enough" this year. The case for considering an alternative is, of course, stronger this year because record numbers are applying in the hope of beating the rise in tuition fees to £9,000-a-year next year.

Design

Leading article: A* fails to make the grade

The news that thousands of youngsters with A* grades at A-level will have been turned away by Oxbridge this year is perhaps not surprising in itself.

Adrian Hamilton: Will a disillusioned public ever regain its faith in our institutions?

Go to the social networking sites and you will find little reassurance that the public appetite for gossip and virulent opinion is on the wane. Just the opposite

On Canaan's Side, By Sebastian Barry

At the close of this novel Lilly Bere, an 89-year-old Irish-American, sits alone in her little house on Long Island after the suicide of her soldier grandson, Bill. He has come back, traumatised, from the first Gulf War. Lilly thinks back to a Dublin childhood. Her family then – two sisters, brother and policeman father - feel closer than the growling storms of the Hamptons shore outside. "There is never a day goes by that we don't drink a strange cup of tea together, in some peculiar parlour-room at the back of my mind."

Boris Johnson accused over 'codswallop' jibe

Boris Johnson would have been "attempting to pervert the course of justice" if he knew police had reopened the investigation into phone hacking when he dismissed fresh allegations as "codswallop", it was claimed yesterday.

Bringing in foreign police chiefs 'stupid'

One of Britain's most senior policemen yesterday branded David Cameron's plans to bring in foreign police chiefs to turn around UK forces in the wake of the phone-hacking scandal "simply stupid".

Public support for a free press drops sharply

Public support for a free press in Britain has dropped sharply since the phone-hacking scandal erupted, according to a new survey.

Government plans 'tougher approach to organised crime'

The Government today promised a "much tougher approach to organised crime" as it outlined a new strategy to tackle drug gangs and fraudsters.

Heartless killers showed no remorse

Cold-blooded killers Kaniel Martin and Avie Howell showed no signs of remorse throughout their two-month trial.

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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine