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Some Bank of England regulators wanted lenders to be forced to raise even more fresh capital than the £25 billion they were told to produce last week, minutes from the latest meeting of the financial policy committee indicate.

Warburg directors join million club: Investment bank's figures confirm 1993 as bumper year for high-flyers Profits double to record pounds 297m

TWO DIRECTORS of SG Warburg, the London-based investment bank, were paid more than pounds 1m last year, confirming 1993 as a bumper year for City high-flyers. A third director earned just short of pounds 1m.

Football: Double pitch invasion at New Den delays Derby victory

Millwall. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

View from City Road: Few defenders of executives' pay

Finding non-executive directors prepared to recommend huge salaries for company bosses is a piece of cake, if the growing number of pounds 1m- plus awards is anything to go by. Finding non-executive directors prepared to defend them is, however, rather more difficult.

Sponsors asked to invade D-Day

Leading firms have been approached by the Government to sponsor Britain's D-Day commemorations in an attempt to cover the expected pounds 500,000 costs.

View from City Road: Knives sharpened at Barclays

Martin Taylor, the disconcertingly youthful new broom at Barclays, would be well advised to keep a keen eye over his shoulder.

View from City Road: Interesting plans at Barclays

Management, what management? Barclays, like most of the clearing banks, has been run for years by bankers - many of them over-promoted, few of them skilled in the ways of running large organisations.

Profile: Banking's boy wonder: Derek Wanless - NatWest's chief has a personal touch but a pragmatic vision, says William Kay

BIDDING among the banks for the hearts and minds of the great British public reached its highest level for some years last week after Martin Taylor, Barclays' new and outspoken chief executive, told a television interviewer that 'people do want to spend a lot of time with the old-fashioned bank manager of myth, but they don't want to pay for it'.

European recession depresses Courtauld

RECESSION on the Continent has undermined profits growth at Courtaulds Textiles, the fabrics concern, in spite of strong demand for its Gossard Ultrabra.

Dear Martin Taylor: You plan to make Barclays less stuffy, pompous and snobbish? You need all the help you can get, says an Independent journalist well versed in the ways of banks

You've certainly made a splash in your debut months as chief executive of Barclays Bank. Your admission that parts of the bank were 'stuffy, pompous and snobbish' was admirably frank. You want to make the bank less formal and status conscious, more open to outsiders. Terrific]

View from City Road: Taylor convinces that Barclays is on the mend

In his tour of where Barclays should go, Martin Taylor, the new chief executive, treated analysts to some rare intellectual excitement. After falling initially the shares struggled up to close 8p higher at 510p. That was the right reaction since Mr Taylor was talking a lot of sense.

Leading Article: Thin excuses for fat cats

ONE OF THE guiding principles of Britain's Tory governments since 1979 has been that top people should be well-rewarded. If incentives were sufficient, executives would fly high and create wealth, the argument ran. Their rewards might seem excessive and unfair to ordinary people but they, too, would benefit - in the famous phrase, wealth would 'trickle down'. We know now that this was piffle. Pay packages of pounds 500,000 a year upwards have become commonplace for company directors, yet a fifth of the population is worse off than it was 15 years ago. Far from trickling down, the money has been swilling around in the boardroom trough. The beneficiaries are well-known. Peter Wood, chief executive of Direct Line, the insurance company ( pounds 18.2m); Lord Hanson, chairman of Hanson plc ( pounds 1.3m last year); Bob Bauman, chief executive of SmithKline Beecham ( pounds 2.1m); Michael Green, chairman of Carlton Communications ( pounds 630,000); Martin Taylor, new chief executive of Barclays Bank ( pounds 737,000); Lord Young, former Tory minister and now chairman of Cable and Wireless ( pounds 863,000); Sir Ian MacLaurin, head of Tesco ( pounds 967,000). As one current case shows, even the chief executive of a quite small company can now expect at least pounds 225,000, including bonus, even though the business has plunged, in a few months, from break- even to heavy loss.

Barclays disposes of Australian operation

BARCLAYS is selling its retail banking operation in Australia to concentrate on corporate work through its existing BZW investment banking arm, writes Tom Stevenson.

Customers buy shares in Barclays to protest

A BANK customers' action group has bought 300 Barclays shares and plans to give them to people with complaints against the bank, so that they can join together and ask questions at the annual shareholders' meetings, writes John Willcock.

Sunday Round-Up: The main stories from yesterday's City pages: The Mail on Sunday

Martin Taylor, the 41-year-old new chief executive of Barclays Bank, is to be paid pounds 737,500. He will also be entitled to remuneration from bonus schemes, including a share option scheme, and pension perks.

City & Business: Greener goes back to basics at Guinness

WHO'S in and who's out among Britain's entrepreneurial bosses these days? Gerry Robinson and Michael Green, heads respectively of Granada and Carlton, are definitely in. Martin Taylor is also in high favour, though with less than a month under his belt as chief executive of Barclays, he's yet to show his form.
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