News Teachers at one of Michael Gove's flagship free schools have suspended their strike action

Teachers have suspended what would have been the first strike action against one of Education Secretary Michael Gove’s flagship free schools.

Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, as imagined by Raphael in this detail from The School of Athens

Universities must back special maths schools to keep UK competitive

Too many British students lack the necessary maths skills to excel in their degrees, according to Education Minister Elizabeth Truss

Do you know your 12 times table?

One times one is...

Regular bedtimes for children 'help brain power'

Inconsistent bedtimes associated with lower reading, maths and spatial awareness scores in study of three year olds

Do you know your 12 times table?

One times one is...

Michael Gove brings back 12 times tables in new curriculum

Children will be taught fractions from the age of five and will once again have to learn the 12 times tables under a controversial new national curriculum to be announced today by the Education Secretary Michael Gove.

People cool off in the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fountain in Hyde Park yesterday as hot weather finally hits London

Britain basks in sunshine at last. But is it all part of the same global pattern of freak weather?

That’s the jet stream, trapped by a warmer Arctic, sparking extreme weather across the planet

Graeme Swann is England's lead spin bowler

Is the art of spin bowling all in the cross-wind? Ahead of the Ashes, England and Australia could learn from these two physicists

Equations that govern the trajectory of a spinning ball as it moves through the air have been published

The Sutton Trust says GCSE maths does not give pupils the skills they need in the modern world of work

Students to study maths until the age of 18

All pupils should have compulsory maths lessons up until the age of 18 - even if they have a top GCSE grade in the subject, says a report out today.

The Education Secretary Michael Gove’s department has been censured by public spending watchdogs over a plan to set up a state boarding school for inner-city children in the heart of the Sussex countryside

Profit making schools will bring chaos and cut standards

It's evidence that running schools on a for-profit basis harms standards, not dogma, that means Labour will never allow it to happen, says the Shadow Education Secretary

Wilson went to Harvard to read mathematics at 16

Kenneth Wilson: Physicist and Nobel laureate

Kenneth Wilson was a visionary physicist who won the 1982 Nobel Prize for his pioneering work on phase transitions, the transformation of thermodynamic systems from one phase or state of matter to another, an area physicists had been wrestling with for decades. This mathematical tool changed theoretical physicists' way of thinking, particularly in particle physics. He also pioneered the use of super-computers in particle physics.

Only 13 per cent of the science, technology, engineering and maths (Stem) workforce are women

Sparks fly over Royal Society gender study

As a new inquiry prepares to look at sexism in British science, one PhD student says it is asking the wrong question

Jeremy Forrest was jailed for five and a half years yesterday

Woman arrested on suspicion of helping school teacher Jeremy Forrest coach his victim for trial

Jeremy Forrest has been sentenced to five-and-a-half years in prison for abducting his pupil to France

The limits of the cuts are being reached

Rules of state spending are being reconsidered

The limits of the cuts are being reached – and now nowhere is safe from the axe

25 June 2013: Used tennis balls are boxed up on day two of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships

Wimbledon 2013 Diary: National sport of queuing; Lucky loser earns £6,000 a game; Murray keeps good work up his sleeve

"It's huge," said an impressed steward. It takes a lot to impress an honorary Wimbledon steward but the size of the ticket queue on day one this year was big even by SW19 standards. By 9am at nearby Southfields Tube station the Tannoy was instructing wannabe spectators to head home if they didn't already have tickets. Such was the demand that the touts – as much part of the experience as strawberries and so on – were only buying. It's another reminder that few countries watch sport, any sport, in such huge numbers as the British, which also probably explains why so few of us play it.

The News Matrix: Monday 24 June 2013

Nine tourists killed in mountain attack

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
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Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee
World War Z author Max Brooks honours WW1's Harlem Hellfighters in new graphic novel

Max Brooks honours Harlem Hellfighters

The author talks about race, legacy and his Will Smith film option to Tim Walker
Why the league system no longer measures up

League system no longer measures up

Jon Coles, former head of standards at the Department of Education, used to be in charge of school performance rankings. He explains how he would reform the system
Valentine's Day cards: 5 best online card shops

Don't leave it to the petrol station: The best online card shops for Valentine's Day

Can't find a card you like on the high street? Try one of these sites for individual, personalised options, whatever your taste
Diego Costa: Devil in blue who upsets defences is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

Devil in blue Costa is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

The Reds are desperately missing Luis Suarez, says Ian Herbert
Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Former one-day coach says he will ‘observe’ their World Cup games – but ‘won’t be jumping up and down’
Greece elections: In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza

Greece elections

In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza, says Patrick Cockburn
Holocaust Memorial Day: Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears

Holocaust Memorial Day

Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears over Europe
Fortitude and the Arctic attraction: Our fascination with the last great wilderness

Magnetic north

The Arctic has always exerted a pull, from Greek myth to new thriller Fortitude. Gerard Gilbert considers what's behind our fascination with the last great wilderness