News

Study found volunteers showed a leftward shift in their political opinions, regardless of their views prior to watching

BAA recovers as Spanish press on

Shares in the airport operator BAA surged back above the price being offered by Ferrovial yesterday after the Spanish construction giant made it clear that it intends to press ahead with its offer despite the threat of a monopolies investigation into the UK airport market.

Final Curtain for Teatro?

Arts: God has taste as well as humour

`Dogma' tries hard to be madcap but only succeeds in committing the ultimate in cinematic blasphemy - it's just plain dull. By Anthony Quinn: DOGMA KEVIN SMITH (15) n MYSTERY MEN KINKA USHER (PG) n THE MUSIC FREELANCERS DENIS DERCOURT (PG) n MUPPETS FROM SPACE TIM HILL (U)

British Psychological Society: Scientists lose Dr Strangelove image

YOUNG PEOPLE no longer see scientists as dangerous geeks who could destroy mankind, but think they can make a difference to the world, according to new research.

Film: In the name of the mother

Kevin Smith's films always feature strong women and weak men. Dogma is no exception. What is he trying to say? By Charlotte O'Sullivan

Why the cinema is still a vital and powerful medium

Good films cannot be like oysters, swallowed whole without chewing or savouring

Scientists are the best story-tellers

This week sees the announcement of a literary prize that has grown in stature in recent years: the Rhone-Poulenc award for science books. Founded after Stephen Hawking confounded the book trade by commandeering the best-seller lists, the pounds 10,000 prize has coincided with (and perhaps helped to fuel) a lavish boom in the publication of eligible titles. Writers such as Stephen Jay Gould and Steven Pinker (a likely winner this week) have become familiar names, and books such as Longitude and Fermat's Last Theorem have confirmed that Hawking's success was by no means an aberration. After decades of neglect - all those jokes about anoraks and blinkered chemists - science has returned to the mainstream. The dreary talk of two cultures also seems to be fading away. Novelists are eager to assimilate the wonders (not to mention the sales potential) of non- fiction. And while the cinema used to present scientists as nutty professors, these days it prefers cool dudes like Jeff Goldblum saving the world with a laptop, or cocky rebels like Matt Damon.

Film: Blasphemy, the movie

Kevin Smith's new film, Dogma, is so controversial that Disney want to bury it. Good lord, what's all the fuss about? By Roger Clarke

Cinema: It's a laughing shame

The Idiots

Return to gender: Men don't talk about anything, let alone other men

OLIVER BENNETT speaks out

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The Critics: Cinema: The Matt Damon backlash starts here

Rounders (15) Ronin (15) The Eel (18) Les Miserables (12) Dead Man's Curve (18) The Fountainhead (PG)

Film: The old percentage game

The Big Picture
News
Davis says: 'My career has been about filling a niche - there were fewer short actors and fewer roles – but now I'm being offered all kinds of things'
PeopleWarwick Davis on Ricky Gervais, Harry Potter and his perfect role
Voices
A Russian hunter at the Medved bear-hunting lodge in Siberia
Save the tigerWildlife charities turn to those who kill animals to help save them
News
i100
Sport
Frank Lampard will pass Billy Wright and equal Bobby Charton’s caps tally of 106 caps against
sportFormer Chelsea midfielder in Etihad stopgap before New York contract
Arts and Entertainment
The first film introduced Daniel Radcliffe to our screens, pictured here as he prepares to board the train to Hogwarts for the first time.
booksHow reading Harry Potter helps children grow up to be gay-friendly
Arts and Entertainment
A scene from Aladdin is performed at the Tony Awards in New York in June
theatreBrit producer Lythgoe makes kids' musical comedy a Los Angeles hit
Sport
Usain Bolt of Jamaica smiles and shakes hands with a competitor after Jamaica won their first heat in the men's 4x100m relay
sport
News
Chancellor George Osborne, along with the Prime Minister, have been 'complacently claiming the economy is now fixed', according to shadow Chancellor Ed Balls
i100... which is awkward, because he is their boss, after all
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
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Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Save the Tiger: Meet the hunters tasked with protecting Russia's rare Amur tiger

Hunters protect Russia's rare Amur tiger

In an unusual move, wildlife charities have enlisted those who kill animals to help save them. Oliver Poole travels to Siberia to investigate
Transfers: How has your club fared in summer sales?

How has your club fared in summer sales?

Who have bagged the bargain buys and who have landed the giant turkeys
Warwick Davis: The British actor on Ricky Gervais, how the Harry Potter set became his office, and why he'd like to play a spy

'I'm a realist; I know how hard this business is'

Warwick Davis on Ricky Gervais, Harry Potter and his perfect role
The best swim shorts for men: Bag yourself the perfect pair and make a splash this summer

The best swim shorts for men

Bag yourself the perfect pair and make a splash this summer
Has Ukip’s Glastonbury branch really been possessed by the devil?

Has Ukip’s Glastonbury branch really been possessed by the devil?

Meet the couple blamed for bringing Lucifer into local politics
Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

In grandfather's footsteps

5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

Martha Stewart has flying robot

The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

A tale of two presidents

George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

The dining car makes a comeback

Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

Gallery rage

How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

Eye on the prize

Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Women's rugby: Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup

Women's rugby

Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup