Arts and Entertainment

Alain de Botton is probably anticipating sceptical reviews of his new book. It is unfortunate that, as a philosophical analysis of the news media, it is bound to be assessed by the very outlets, often resistant to change, that it seeks to correct.

'Playground monikers for playground politicians': Giant balloons of Ken Livingstone and Boris Johnson during the 2008 mayoral elections

Johnson's Life of London, By Boris Johnson - You Can't Say That, By Ken Livingstone

The Mayor of London enjoys a "mandate over policing", according to the Metropolitan Police Authority, whose chair and vice-chair he appoints. He "remains the direct line of accountability between the Metropolitan Police Service and the people of London". Through the MPA, the Mayor's oversight covers "the appointment and discipline of senior police officers".

Centrica profits fall as warm spell hits gas use

Centrica issued a profits warning yesterday and pledged to step up its cost-cutting campaign after an unusually warm autumn allowed cost-conscious consumers to reduce their energy consumption.

Labour to cut spending

A future Labour government would have to find "new ways" to deliver social justice without boosting public spending, Ed Miliband warned yesterday. The Labour leader said there could be no return to the "Blair-Brown model", under which tax revenues from Britain's financial services were used to raise spending on public services.

Vivendi storms markets with all guns blazing

French group Vivendi beat profit expectations in the third quarter, largely thanks to its computer game operation.

Sony to make its move into online television

Japanese electronics firm weighs up risky plan to take on cable and satellite giants in the US

Sacked features editor sues News international

Senior News Corp figures such as the former Daily Telegraph editor Will Lewis may find themselves giving evidence on the company's handling of phone hacking as part of a legal case being brought by a former executive on The Sun.

Camera market's middleground snaps up CSC

The new category of compact system camera is taking the market by storm, offering photographic enthusiasts the chance to acquire all the bells and whistles of a DSLR in a much smaller package

TalkTalk loses 43,000 customers in a quarter

Customer losses at the broadband supplier TalkTalk were worse than expected, down 43,000 in the three months to the end of September. But the turn-around strategy is "well on track", its chief executive Dido Harding said yesterday.

Aggrieved journalists 'could use inquiry to get revenge'

Journalists should not be allowed to give evidence anonymously to Lord Leveson, the publisher of the Daily Mail is arguing.

Have yourself a techie little Christmas

As we approach the end of yet another year of technological innovation, we look at 35 of the best bits of kit currently on the market

Fund manager builds $800m News Corp stake

Chris Hohn, one of the City of London's most aggressive fund managers, snapped up an $834m stake in News Corp while Rupert Murdoch's company was embroiled in the phone-hacking scandal, it was revealed last night.

Dealmaking for entrepreneurs

Deal-making and negotiation skills are critical for entrepreneurs. Success depends not just on great ideas and marketing skills, but also on a network of deals which all entrepreneurs have to put in place. These include deals for funding, manufacturing, distribution, marketing and promotion, and deals with employees. And let’s not forget the deal at the end of the cycle – the exit deal – which is supposed to make all of that effort, and all of the other deals worthwhile.

Glen Mulcaire lost a legal bid to hide the identities of those who instructed him

Hacking 'took place until 2009'

Police believe the publishers of the News of the World were involved in hacking phones as recently as 2009, the Leveson Inquiry into press standards heard today.

Ian Burrell: Is Desmond planning to move Northern & Shell out of London to Luton?

Viewpoint: The N&S print plant lacks the prestige of the Thames-side headquarters of Express Newspapers

Sport on TV: Aussies are left looking for a hero in virtual world

Cricket is facing a test of credibility – but not because some players cheat. It's also because of the number of nurdlers and sloggers masquerading as Test cricketers. Last summer's series against India was billed as the battle for the world No 1 slot but they sent over a pub team – though admittedly one with a rather good ringer in Sachin Tendulkar. Now South Africa and Australia are contesting the main series of the winter as if it was an Under-9s house match. It's becoming difficult to tellif a player is deliberately underperforming or if he's just rubbish.

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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine