Michael Sheen

The Diary: James Franco; ICA; Michael Sheen; Steven Berkoff; Miranda

Continuing his bid to become Hollywood's hottest polymath, James Franco popped up at the Berlin Film Festival this week, not on the red carpet but at a private view for his first commer-cial art exhibition. The Dangerous Book Four Boys at Peres Projects includes photo-graphs, sculptures, found objects and over 20 video works made by the 32-year old actor who is preparing to host the Oscars next weekend.

Tim Burton: Boyhood traumas of a director

His films are pervaded by darkness and peopled by outsiders. As the director's 'Alice in Wonderland' opens, he talks to Gill Pringle about the origins of his demons

Film favourites: Politicians to pop stars reveal the movies that

The transformative power of film is something that Hollywood has always depended upon. Think of those portentous voiceovers on trailers: they seem to promise the viewer – in their peculiarly over-enunciated way – a more exciting, more romantic, somehow better life. It's all a stardust-sprinkled illusion, of course: watching Angelina Jolie pout through a love scene won't actually make you any more beautiful. Nor will gasping at Daniel Craig as he fells evil henchmen make you any stronger, pound for pound. But for 90 minutes, anything seems possible.

Pandora: The curious case of Brangelina

Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie were two of the most eagerly-anticipated guests at last night's Baftas, having won three nominations between them. But I'm told that the Hollywood couple's attendance was far from guaranteed. In fact, as the first of the guests arrived on the red carpet, organisers claimed that they still weren't sure whether "Brangelina" would make it.

Hours previously, Jolie had been pictured in Thailand, which she was visiting in her role as a United Nations' Goodwill Ambassador and, although she had booked a suite at London's Dorchester hotel, she hadn't been photographed since.

"We don't know for certain if they're coming at all," fretted one spokesperson for the event. Happily – and to the relief of the waiting paparazzi – the beautiful twosome arrived in good time, explaining that they had spent the day indoors enjoying tea and scones.

Frost/Nixon (15)

The atmosphere of Frost/Nixon is so heavy with self-importance that you'd be forgiven for thinking that, in it, the very fate of Western politics hangs in the balance. Ron Howard and Peter Morgan have opened up the latter's stage play to embrace a world of ritzy hotels and stretch limos, but he has kept the quasi-documentary build-up to persuade us that what we're to witness is a duel as legendary as David and Goliath, and as enthralling as Ali versus Foreman. And the prize at stake in this momentous encounter? An apology on TV from a disgraced politician. Pardon me if I'm underwhelmed.

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