Sport

Villa are relegation candidates

When Aston Villa lost 1-0 at home to Crystal Palace on Boxing Day, their manager’s reaction was telling. At least, said Paul Lambert, they had worked hard. Given that last season Villa had the seventh-highest wage bill in the league, owner Randy Lerner may feel entitled to more than hard work. After a lucky 1-1 draw against Swansea, Lambert said: “We are not in a relegation fight”. As they are four points off the drop zone and averaging less than a point a game at home, others may feel differently.

Last Night's TV: One for the collection of Auntie's bloomers

Fashion Versus The BBC, BBC4<br />Dodi al-Fayed: What Really Happened, Channel 4</B>

Bullard shows his value to Cottagers' industry

Fulham 3 Middlesbrough 0

Police investigate claims Fayed sexually assaulted 15-year-old

Harrods owner accused of forcibly kissing teenage girl

Fulham 0, Sunderland 0: Richardson misses a vintage moment

It was a day for nostalgia at the homely old Cottage by the banks of the Thames. At lunchtime, Mohamed Al-Fayed, the Fulham chairman, unveiled a statue of Johnny Haynes, three years to the day after the ultimate passing of the man Pele hailed as "the best passer of the ball I've ever seen"

The race for the stars: Top flight set for record transfer spree

It's that time of year when the Big Four go for the big fish, middle managers go begging to their benefactors and the new boys try to stay afloat. Nick Harris looks forward to a summer of spending

Maximum exposure: Inside Max Clifford's tranquil Surrey home

PR supremo Max Clifford has made his name with sex scandals and celebrity clients. But his tranquil Surrey home tells a very different story

Michael Mansfield: Meet Britain&rsquo;s boldest barrister

He's achieved fame (and fortune) securing freedom for the victims of Britain's worst miscarriages of justice. But when he agreed torepresent Mohamed Al Fayed, Michael Mansfield was accused of selling out. As he takes on yet another extraordinary brief, on behalf of Jean-Charles de Menezes, the nation's best-known civil rights lawyer gives Esther Walker the case for his own defence

Robert Verkaik: Why verdict will not silence the conspiracy theorists

Those hoping that the jury's verdicts on the deaths of Diana, Princess of Wales and Dodi Fayed would silence the conspiracy theorists will be disappointed.

Drunk driver and feral paparazzi caused deaths of Diana and Dodi, says inquest

Princess Diana and Dodi Fayed died in a road accident caused by the dangerous driving of their chauffeur and a reckless pack of paparazzi motorcyclists, a jury concluded yesterday.

Leading article: Laid to rest

Unlike many newspapers, The Independent always believed it was right that a public inquest be held into the death of Diana, Princess of Wales. Now that the inquiry has found that Diana was unlawfully killed due to the "gross negligence" of her driver, Henri Paul, that evening in Paris 11 years ago, we continue to believe that it was right that the inquest was established. It is vital not only that justice is done, but that it is seen to be done. It is true that there was no compelling evidence that Diana was murdered, as Mohamed Al Fayed – whose son Dodi perished in the same crash – has long asserted.

Diana inquest: Who said what

The following are quotes from the Diana, Princess of Wales inquest:

Diana jury blames driver and paparazzi

Driver Henri Paul and paparazzi share the blame for the manslaughter of Diana, Princess of Wales and Dodi Fayed, the jury at their inquest concluded today.

No conspiracy, Diana coroner concludes after &#163;10m inquest

The Duke of Edinburgh and MI6 have been cleared of arranging the deaths of Diana, Princess of Wales, and Dodi Fayed after the coroner Lord Justice Scott Baker said there was not a shred of evidence to support a conspiracy theory.

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown: Corruption is now endemic in our political culture

I wonder if dishonesty at high levels is now so embedded in the British political culture that those who indulge in it truly don't consider it a wrong, consider the odd financial naughtiness nothing more than that or a treat they occasionally give themselves.

Pandora: Blue scarf hides Ken's blushes

When the rapper Eminem crosses swords with someone, you can usually guarantee that sparks will fly. So, understandably perhaps, there has been some uneasy shuffling over at the London-based publishers Orion during the past few days.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent