Morgan Freeman

Woody Allen, Hannibal Lecter & me: The Best Picture Oscar winners that

When people see the label Academy Award Winner," said Martin Scorsese, "they go and see that movie." Indeed they do – not just because the Oscar means it's the best film of the year, but because they can measure themselves against it: they can see how much it speaks to them or moves them, or conjures up the time they're living in. Along with the presidential election, the Oscar provides a mirror to Americans of the kind of people they are and tells them: this is the best we can do, apparently. Sometimes they may dislike what they see (Kramer vs Kramer? Are you sure? George W Bush? Are you sure?), but they're stuck with it.

David Brown: Film and theatre producer who worked with Spielberg and

After David Brown formed an independent production company with Richard Zanuck in 1972, they were responsible for two of the biggest money-making movies, The Sting (1973), which won seven Oscars including Best Film, and Jaws (1975), directed by their protégé, Stephen Spielberg. Brown and Zanuck had been ousted from executive positions at 20th Century-Fox, where Richard's father, Darryl F. Zanuck, had been studio head. They later dissolved their partnership, but still teamed up occasionally, their later films including Robert Altman's 1992 satire of Hollywood, The Player.

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Cultural Life: Laura Marling, Singer

I just started reading a collection of Raymond Carver's short stories, Where I'm Calling From. I've only read two of the stories. "A Small, Good Thing" is very quickly heartbreaking. It is about a woman whose son is hit by a car while she is buying cakes. I am still reading A Good Man in Africa by William Boyd.

Morgan Freeman: His darkest night

He is one of cinema's most bankable and best-loved actors. Morgan Freeman also kept his private life away from public scrutiny – until a midnight car crash

Clint Eastwood - the stardust cowboy

The 78-year-old Clint Eastwood is being honoured by a major retrospective at London's BFI. No wonder, says James Mottram, as this is a career that shows no sign of slowing down