Morgan Freeman

Hollywood producer Zanuck dies, aged 77

Film producer Richard Zanuck, who won the best picture Oscar for Driving Miss Daisy and was involved in such blockbuster films as Jaws and The Sting after his father, Hollywood mogul Darryl F. Zanuck, fired him from 20th Century Fox, has died. He was 77.

Woody Allen, Hannibal Lecter & me: The Best Picture Oscar winners that

When people see the label Academy Award Winner," said Martin Scorsese, "they go and see that movie." Indeed they do – not just because the Oscar means it's the best film of the year, but because they can measure themselves against it: they can see how much it speaks to them or moves them, or conjures up the time they're living in. Along with the presidential election, the Oscar provides a mirror to Americans of the kind of people they are and tells them: this is the best we can do, apparently. Sometimes they may dislike what they see (Kramer vs Kramer? Are you sure? George W Bush? Are you sure?), but they're stuck with it.

Bill Gold: Make my day... with a poster

Bill Gold's posters have become almost as iconic as the movies they promote. As a book of the designer's work is released, Clint Eastwood pays tribute to a creative collaborator and a true Hollywood hero

David Brown: Film and theatre producer who worked with Spielberg and

After David Brown formed an independent production company with Richard Zanuck in 1972, they were responsible for two of the biggest money-making movies, The Sting (1973), which won seven Oscars including Best Film, and Jaws (1975), directed by their protégé, Stephen Spielberg. Brown and Zanuck had been ousted from executive positions at 20th Century-Fox, where Richard's father, Darryl F. Zanuck, had been studio head. They later dissolved their partnership, but still teamed up occasionally, their later films including Robert Altman's 1992 satire of Hollywood, The Player.

Top Ten Literary Tear Jerkers

There are lots of things that I’m not particularly proud of; my driving, the sight of my feet in sandals, my behaviour at a free buffet. I am also, it must be confessed, an easy crier. Tales of adversity, children sleeping, Thora Hird, any of these things can have me shielding my eyes with my hand. It’s not a particularly attractive tendency, but one I’ve learnt to live with, and at least I’m a little tougher now than I once was. As a child I used to fall to pieces weekly at the closing theme to The Incredible Hulk, and one of my earliest, most shaming memories, is having to leave the room during a Royal Variety Performance when a plucky red-haired orphan girl sang about how the sun was going to come out to-mor-row, bet your bottom dollar that tomorrow there’d be sun.

DVD: The Dark Knight, Retail & Rental, (Warner)

Christopher Nolan tops his own 'Batman Begins' with a film that's less inspired by superhero comics than by crime novels, as it traces the trail of a city's corruption from its backalleys to its corridors of power.

Cultural Life: Laura Marling, Singer

I just started reading a collection of Raymond Carver's short stories, Where I'm Calling From. I've only read two of the stories. "A Small, Good Thing" is very quickly heartbreaking. It is about a woman whose son is hit by a car while she is buying cakes. I am still reading A Good Man in Africa by William Boyd.

Morgan Freeman: His darkest night

He is one of cinema's most bankable and best-loved actors. Morgan Freeman also kept his private life away from public scrutiny – until a midnight car crash

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The Big Question: How do censors determine the award of certificates

The new Batman movie, besides being wildly popular, may be the most violent and disturbing film to have been passed as a 12A – and that rating has led some people to question the validity of the movie certification system. Concern has been expressed in the Press, and on Newsnight Review on BBC2 last week, critic Paul Morley said that he was "absolutely staggered" that children would be able to attend the film. The controversy is heightened by the fact that under the British Board of Film Classification (BBFC)'s 12A rating, a child of any age accompanied by an adult will be able to see the movie.

Batmobile rolls into town for premiere of 'Dark Knight'

Huge crowds, a red carpet snaking the length of Leicester Square and celebrities galore. This, though, was no ordinary film premiere – the first sign of that being the two-ton black Batmobile that crawled slowly through the streets of the West End before pulling up at a Bat-emblazoned Odeon theatre to offload its A-list cast.

The Dark Knight: the legacy of Heath Ledger

The Australian actor's death deprived Hollywood of one of its brightest young stars. But his performance as The Joker in the new Batman film suggests he was saving his best for last. David Usborne reports on an unlikely candidate for success at the Oscars