Arts and Entertainment In rehearsal: the Don is sung in Kasper Holten's new production by the Polish baritone Mariusz Kwiecien

As the Royal Opera opens its new Don Giovanni, Jessica Duchen argues that its theme of moral vacuity is as relevant now as in Mozart's day

Australian Chamber Orchestra/ Tognetti, Queen Elizabeth Hall (4/5)

At the core of the Australian Chamber Orchestra is a string ensemble, soloistic in nature, enquiring in spirit, whose connections one to the other make for a palpable kind of musical telepathy.

Alice Sara Ott, Queen Elizabeth Hall

Every year the international piano circus requires a new pin-up: last year’s was Yuja Wang, this year it’s Alice Sara Ott.

Don Garrard: Bass who made his name with the Sadler's Wells company

The Canadian bass Don Garrard sang in the UK for over 20 years, with the Royal Opera, Scottish Opera, Welsh National Opera, and above all with Sadler's Wells, now English National Opera. He had a natural authority, both of voice and bearing, that served him well in roles such as Sarastro in The Magic Flute, Prince Gremin in Tchaikowsky's Eugene Onegin and the Grand Inquisitor in Verdi's Don Carlos. The warmth of his voice and personality also allowed him to play loving fathers with equal facility; among these Daland in Wagner's The Flying Dutchman and Arkel in Debussy's Pelléas et Mélisande are good examples. His singing was also much appreciated in Canada and the US.

Listen to This, By Alex Ross

From John Dowland to Led Zeppelin, JS Bach to Robert Johnson, critic Alex Ross spans many octaves without any sign of strain.

Scottish Ballet Double Bill, Playhouse, Edinburgh<br/>Sriyah, King's Theatre, Edinburgh

Jorma Elo's new dance for Scottish Ballet is a polyglot piece of childlike experiment and joy

Prom 60, Fray/Netherlands RPO/Zweden (Royal Albert Hall)

Bruckner and Mahler may attract the same kind of crowd, but as characters they have nothing in common. While Mahler was a worldly neurotic with an over-developed messiah-complex, Bruckner was a tormented and obsessive social simpleton. Yet when Mahler’s sixth symphony and Bruckner’s eighth are given a Proms airing just four days apart, comparisons rise unbidden to the mind, and not only because, by a strange coincidence, they both last exactly 85 minutes.

Scottish Ballet, Edinburgh Playhouse

Scottish Ballet's appearances at the Edinburgh International Festival are big occasions: they are both at home and on an international stage. This year, they unveiled a world premiere and their first performances of one of Kenneth MacMillan's best-loved works. The dancers rose triumphantly to these challenges.

Free drink and programme when you see ENO productions of The Elixir of Love or The Marriage of Figaro

Jonathan Miller’s triumphant staging of Donizetti’s comic masterpiece 'The Elixir of Love' returns to the London Coliseum this September for a limited run of only nine performances, while Fiona Shaw brings her unique creative flair to a major new production of Mozart’s immensely popular classic 'The Marriage of Figaro' in October.

Mozart&rsquo;s Don Giovanni, OperaUpClose, Soho Theatre

Fired by the Olivier-winning success of their miniature ‘Boheme’ last year, OperaUpClose have become fizzingly prolific. After three pocket productions at the Kings Head, they have now moved back to the slightly more spacious Soho Theatre with ‘Mozart’s Don Giovanni’, whose title reflects the fact that other cooks besides Wolfgang had a hand in its creation.

I'm going it alone: celebrated musical duo Claudio Abbado and Hélène Grimaud split over solo

The dispute appears to have been over the choice of a cadenza in a Mozart piano concerto they were to record

Viviana Sofronitsky, Wigmore Hall, London

An instrument fit for Liszt, in his time and in ours

Cendrillon, Royal Opera House, London<br/>Le nozze di Figaro, Opera Holland Park, London<br/>Rinaldo, Glyndebourne, East Sussex

A picture-perfect production of Massenet's take on the enduring fairy tale brings the Royal Opera House season to a triumphant end

Mystery man: Key collaborators on Terrence Malick's latest film discuss the invisible filmmaker

Terrence Malick is the invisible filmmaker. He never gives interviews and refuses to have his picture taken. Inevitably, this has created an air of mystery around him. There is a suspicion that he must be a Stanley Kubrick-like recluse: an eccentric visionary with strange foibles. However, speak to key collaborators on his most recent film, The Tree of Life (which won the Palme d'Or in Cannes and is released in the UK tomorrow), and what is immediately apparent is the affection in which he is held, and the eagerness that top technicians and actors all have to work with him.

The enduring myth of music and maths

Is there really a link between melodic and mathematic ability? Think carefully before buying those 'Mozart effect' CDs, says Tim Gowers
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