National Gallery

Bob Dylan's artwork enters hallowed halls of National Portrait Gallery

Bob Dylan may have earned himself a host of complimentary descriptions from “poet of our time” to “lyrical genius”. But the 110 million album-selling folk musician has been battling to be taken seriously as a visual artist for almost as long as he has been singing songs, and now 12 of his artworks are set to enter the National Portrait Gallery - the first time he has exhibited in a public museum in the UK.

Gwyn Hanssen Pigott: Potter whose work was acclaimed for its clarity

Gwyn Hanssen Pigott was a major figure in the field of international studio ceramics, whose work was characterised by its clarity and calm. From the mid-1980s she began to group apparently functional wares, in the form of bottles, beakers, cups and bowls, into sculptural still-life sequences of timeless purity, a move in the direction of fine art, seen at its most ambitious in her 55ft installation Caravan, shown at Tate St Ives in 2004.

Dung heaps serve as reminder of Nazi past

Visitors to Berlin's main modern art museum this summer should take care not to step on piles of horse manure, placed as a reminder of art that was stolen, destroyed or went missing under Nazi rule.

The ordinary couple who amassed an extraordinary collection of modern

On the surface, Herbert Vogel and his wife, Dorothy, lived an ordinary life in New York. Mr Vogel, who died on Sunday, aged 89, used to work nights sorting mail at the city's post offices, and his wife was a reference librarian in Brooklyn. But over the years, the couple built up one of the world's most unlikely – and most significant – collections of modern art, and bequeathed much of it to the National Gallery of Art in Washington.

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