News Reading a novel may boost brain functionality for days, new research has found

Reading a gripping novel causes biological changes in the brain which last for days as the mind is transported into the body of the protagonist

How changes in weather can give you a headache

Scientists discover why weekend warm spell may have given you a migraine

Rare condition leaves children severely disabled

Ivan Cameron suffered from a very rare epilepsy syndrome that was coupled with severe cerebral palsy.

How we're fighting our child’s autism

Geoff Sewell and Simone Lanham were devastated when doctors told them their daughter’s condition was incurable. But after three years of research and treatments costing £100,000, they are seeing surprising results. Rob Sharp reports

Sleepers who hit out 'prone to dementia'

People who punch or kick out in their sleep are more likely to develop dementia or Parkinson's disease, research revealed today.

Single-sex schools 'are the future'

Differences in how male and female brains work mean single-sex schooling will make a comeback, a leading headmistress says.

Drug can reverse the effects of MS

Discovery is hailed as breakthrough in treatment of debilitating condition

Leading Article: Black, white and shades of grey

More than 100 Britons have travelled to Switzerland to take advantage of the country's assisted suicide law, according to recent figures from the Dignitas clinic. Among them – as we report today – was Daniel James, a 23 year-old who was paralysed after a rugby accident. From beginning to end, this is a tragic case. Who knows what was in Mr James's mind when he decided to do what he did? Was there something more that could have been done to make his life more tolerable? This and related questions may be tackled in the course of the police inquiry and inquest that have been ordered.

MS sufferer seeks legal clarity on aided suicide

A 45-year-old woman with a progressively debilitating disease appealed to the High Court yesterday to clarify the law on assisted suicide to enable her to plan her own death.

You write the reviews: Benefit for Macmillan Nurses and Multiple Sclerosis Society, Comedy Store, London

There was a 10 per cent drop in ticket sales at this year's Edinburgh Fringe Festival box office, possibly due to a lack of public interest or thriftiness as recession looms. But this gig at central London's world-famous Comedy Store was sold out.

Noble Vs Major: Sir John and Lady Major deny claims they are ignoring their autistic grandchild

The son of the former prime minister Sir John Major accused his ex-wife of making "wholly false and hurtful allegations" last night after she publicly claimed that his parents were ignoring their autistic eight-year-old grandson, Harry.

Dando accused's brain 'severely abnormal'

The man accused of killing the television presenter Jill Dando will not be giving evidence in his own defence, the Old Bailey heard yesterday.

Her Name is Sabine (12A)

The French actress Sandrine Bonnaire's documentary portrait of her younger sister Sabine is, at times, so poignant you feel your heart might break.

Breakthrough in migraine therapy

New anti-migraine drugs that have fewer side effects than existing treatments could be on the market within three years, scientists said yesterday.

MS sufferer seeks answers over laws on euthanasia laws

A woman who suffers from a degenerative disease has called for the law on assisted suicide to be clarified so that she can decide when she wants to die.

This Is Your Brain on Music, By Daniel Levitin

We can all appreciate and enjoy music, yet the study of it can seem excessively rarefied, and you'd think the study of its neurological effect on the brain even more so. The success of this book, by a record producer turned cognitive neuroscientist, is both that it goes out of its way to make the general reader feel at ease, and that it celebrates a capacity for analysing and understanding music that is extraordinary – in several regards still inexplicably so – but that is nevertheless shared by any person with a normal brain.

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Turkey-Kurdish conflict: Obama's deal with Ankara is a betrayal of Syrian Kurds and may not even weaken Isis

US betrayal of old ally brings limited reward

Since the accord, the Turks have only waged war on Kurds while no US bomber has used Incirlik airbase, says Patrick Cockburn
VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but doubts linger over security

'A gift from Egypt to the rest of the world'

VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but is it really needed?
Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, applauds a man who clearly has more important things on his mind
The male menopause and intimations of mortality

Aches, pains and an inkling of mortality

So the male menopause is real, they say, but what would the Victorians, 'old' at 30, think of that, asks DJ Taylor
Man Booker Prize 2015: Anna Smaill - How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?

'How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?'

Man Booker Prize nominee Anna Smaill on the rise of Kiwi lit
Bettany Hughes interview: The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems

Bettany Hughes interview

The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems
Art of the state: Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China

Art of the state

Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China
Mildreds and Vanilla Black have given vegetarian food a makeover in new cookbooks

Vegetarian food gets a makeover

Long-time vegetarian Holly Williams tries to recreate some of the inventive recipes in Mildreds and Vanilla Black's new cookbooks
The haunting of Shirley Jackson: Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?

The haunting of Shirley Jackson

Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?
Bill Granger recipes: Heading off on holiday? Try out our chef's seaside-inspired dishes...

Bill Granger's seaside-inspired recipes

These dishes are so easy to make, our chef is almost embarrassed to call them recipes
Ashes 2015: Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

A woefully out-of-form Michael Clarke embodies his team's fragile Ashes campaign, says Michael Calvin
Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza

Andrew Grice: Inside Westminster

Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza
HMS Victory: The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

Exclusive: David Keys reveals the research that finally explains why HMS Victory went down with the loss of 1,100 lives
Survivors of the Nagasaki atomic bomb attack: Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism

'I saw people so injured you couldn't tell if they were dead or alive'

Nagasaki survivors on why Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism
Jon Stewart: The voice of Democrats who felt Obama had failed to deliver on his 'Yes We Can' slogan, and the voter he tried hardest to keep onside

The voter Obama tried hardest to keep onside

Outgoing The Daily Show host, Jon Stewart, became the voice of Democrats who felt the President had failed to deliver on his ‘Yes We Can’ slogan. Tim Walker charts the ups and downs of their 10-year relationship on screen