News Reading a novel may boost brain functionality for days, new research has found

Reading a gripping novel causes biological changes in the brain which last for days as the mind is transported into the body of the protagonist

Gene therapy proven to work in treatment of Parkinson's disease

Scientists have proved for the first time that gene therapy is an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease, the progressive disorder of the nervous system which causes tremors, delayed movements and rigidity.

Grace Williams Says it Loud, By Emma Henderson

A first novel that speaks volumes

Video: 'Cooled' baby makes complete recovery

A baby girl born starved of oxygen, whose body was cooled for three days to reduce brain damage, has made a complete recovery.

Amis: I’d write for children only if I'd had a brain injury

Children's authors have hit back at comments by Martin Amis in which he said he would need to "have a serious brain injury" before he would consider writing children's literature.

New tests could identify Alzheimer's early

Early signs of Alzheimer's can be detected in apparently healthy people with a combination of brain scans and spinal fluid testing, a study has shown.

Employers fail people with mental health problems

Prejudice in the workplace and a lack of policies force many sufferers to hide their illnesses

Breakthrough could lead to MS drug

An advance in the understanding of multiple sclerosis that could lead to the development of drugs to reverse the condition was hailed by experts yesterday.

Are We Related?, Edited by Liz Jobey

Philip Larkin's famously frank condemnation of the effects of parents - that they "fuck us up" - lead us into this Granta collection of fiction and memoir on family relationships.

Scientists identify brain's region for introspection

Scientists have identified the part of the brain that appears to control introspection – the ability to think about what you are thinking.

Cathy John: My diagnosis with MS has taught me the wisdom of 'gathering ye rosebuds while ye may'

Tolstoy once quoted an Eastern parable, which he felt summed up the three responses to the utter absurdity of life in light of the certainty of death.

Brain scan promises to identify the hidden sufferers of autism

Autism could in future be diagnosed in 15 minutes from a brain scan – saving patients and their families years of suffering from a condition that can go unrecognised for decades.

Spinal fluid test provides Alzheimer's diagnosis

Scientists have taken a step towards developing an early screening test for Alzheimer's disease.

Speech pattern can give early clue to autism

Children with autism may in future be diagnosed by the way they talk and parents may be able to measure their progress by monitoring their speech. Scientists have discovered that the condition has a "unique vocal signature" which could allow affected children to be identified before they show obvious symptoms.

Low vitamin D may lead to Parkinson's

A shortage of vitamin D can lead to Parkinson's disease and mental decline in old age, new research suggests. One 30-year study of 3,000 people revealed a three-fold higher risk of developing Parkinson's in those with low blood levels of vitamin D.

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Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
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Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence