Arts and Entertainment

Mario Testino’s talent with a camera must be maddening for other photographers working in a highly competitive field, but he remains one of the most revered stars in his profession. Testino has a natural ability to float effortlessly from studio to backstage to after-party, producing stunning shots in any kind of situation. From royals to mega-celebrities, Testino has shot some of the world’s most inaccessible subjects, always with an ease that betrays the complexity of the task. When Testino gets “in your face” he captures you at your best — and that is what makes him the best.

Woman accused of hate campaign wins damages from Scientologists

THE CHURCH of Scientology agreed to pay pounds 55,000 in damages yesterday to a former member it had accused of being a "hate campaigner", ending six years of claim and counter-claim that the woman said mirrored the trials of Job.

Are Tom and Nicole's eyes wide shut?

NICOLE KIDMAN and Tom Cruise have just embarked on what may prove to be an entertaining libel suit. They are suing an American magazine, The Star, which suggested that two of the prettiest actors in Hollywood needed the help of sex therapists on the set of Eyes Wide Shut. Apparently the couple believe that this suggestion of an "inability to portray sufficiently realistic love scenes" has "damaged their credibility as romantic lead actors".

Film: A short history of the cinema redhead

Witty, wilful, wild... Next to the screen's scarlet women, blondes are merely bland. By Nina Caplan

Net Gains: A life in pictures - Stanley Kubrick

www.krusch.com/kubrick/kq.html

Kidman unrobed in Kubrick's final legacy

STANLEY KUBRICK, who died last week, was considered to be the most radical of directors. But even he, it seems, could not change some cinematic traditions.

Obituary: Stanley Kubrick

AS A film director, Stanley Kubrick was an obsessed perfectionist. He became a very mysterious personality, for he refused to give interviews. He kept out of the idiotic showbiz limelight, so his character was not diluted by over-exposure in the media. He preserved unusual artistic integrity, though he was not above sowing false trails in his personal and professional life.

Last autocrat of the movies leaves a rich legacy from his obsessive odyssey with a rich legacy of masterpieces

STANLEY KUBRICK'S biographer Michael Ciment called him "one of the most demanding, most original and most visionary film-makers of our time". The only superlative he omitted was, the most reclusive.

Real Choices: Book this

HOT ON the heels of Nicole Kidman, who took David Hare's The Blue Room to Broadway, is Cate Blanchett in a revival of Hare's Plenty. This alternative ginger-and-alabaster Australian, Oscar-nominated for her role in the film Elizabeth, plays Susan Traherne, a fictional ex-Special Operations Executive whose covert wartime activities make her a liability to her civil servant husband. Traherne's mental instability and frustrations between 1943 and the mid-1960s are a metaphor for Britain's struggles after WWII. Tickets to see Blanchett, whose co-stars include Julian Wadham and Debra Gillett, are already selling out. Will the fact that she remains fully-clothed imperil her chances of a transatlantic transfer? Book early to find out if Vanity Fair's latest cover girl could be Hare's next West End emissary. RH

The arts in 1999: Film - The Force will be with us, like it or not

It was the French actor, playwright, film-maker and wit Sacha Guitry who said it first: "The cinema isn't Latin. It's American." That was in 1919.

Stars flock to fringe theatres

IT IS now impossible to throw a brick in some parts of north London without hitting a movie superstar who is looking for a poorly paid part in a small, but hip, stage play.

Too good to be true?

Where once they were selfish and spoilt, Hollywood women now trade on syrupy sweetness. The irony is that if they weren't so damn nice you might actually like them.

Cruise awarded damages for libel

THE ACTORS Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman yesterday accepted undisclosed, "substantial" libel damages over allegations that their marriage was a "hypocritical sham".

A whiff of imitation erotica at pounds 1,000 a ticket

For all the discreet flashes of a Kidman breast or thigh, this is safe, celebrity sex

Literary Notes: Monstrous vanity and romantic myth

NEWTON SAID that he stood on the shoulders of giants. This acknowledgement to antiquity concealed his failure to give his due to Leibniz, whose invention of calculus had beaten Newton to it. Similarly, Henry James claimed in a preface to The Portrait of a Lady to be the first novelist to make a woman central in her own right - as though he had never heard of Emma and Jane Eyre. Half a century later, Auden wanted to give James "a good shaking". He saw how "out of their monstrous vanity human creatures want to be their own cause".

Nicole Kidman? Give me an old bag

HANDS UP EVERYONE who came down to breakfast this morning and someone else told you their dream. Quite so, and it won't do. There's only one acceptable dream to recount, and it goes "I dreamt you were making love to me, and it was catastrophically, oceanically wonderful." I was going to say that that one only works if it's someone you actually want to be dreaming about you, but then I thought, no, hell, it doesn't matter. There are probably goats who dream about me. Probably mullet. Anything. I am glad that their dreams are so blissful.
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