News Deputy to EU foreign policy chief Helga Schmid arriving at the Intercontinetal Hotel in Geneva. Iran and world powers were set for new talks in Geneva on how to implement a landmark deal aimed at containing Tehran's nuclear drive

But US says discussions are not over yet

Editorial: Tough choices on nuclear power

Britain's energy policy is in trouble. Plans to have five more nuclear plants running by 2025 look like missing their targets without significant foreign investment, part of which, until recently, it was hoped would come from China. But since a Chinese consortium suspended interest in UK projects, the future of the five has looked questionable and pressure is on to lure back Chinese investors or find others.

Beyond the revolution: Bushehr nuclear power plant, southern Iran

Nuclear Iran: The Birth of an Atomic State, By David Patrikarakos

This is a welcome analysis of Iran's self-perception, its nuclear plans and Western responses

Eiji Kawashima was in inspired form against France

Nuclear reaction: Japan angered after French TV makes 'Fukushima effect' joke in relation to goalkeeper Eiji Kawashima

A joke on French television which showed a composite picture of Japanese goalkeeper Eiji Kawashima with four arms and then dubbed it the 'Fukushima effect' has caused anger in Japan.

Top Israeli Rabbi urges prayers for the destruction of Iran

An influential Israeli Rabbi has called for prayers for Iran's destruction, a week after Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu appeared to court his support for a possible attack on a nuclear programme Israel sees as an existential threat.

After the Rainfall, Pleasance Dome, Edinburgh

A blurb describing After the Rainfall, a new production by Curious Directive, says that the drama explores “ant migration patterns”. It does, in depth, but don’t let that put you off.

AEA Technology 'worthless' as it hoists for sale sign

The struggling climate-change firm AEA Technology finally gave up the ghost yesterday as it put itself up for sale and said the shares were worth nothing.

Protests as Japan restarts nuclear power plant

Dozens of demonstrators in Japan are protesting against the restarting of a nuclear power plant - the first to go back online since all reactors were shut down for safety checks following the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

One of Potash Corp's mines in Saskatchewan, Canada, where a foreign takeover was bitterly opposed

Firm hopes promise of jobs will gather support for potash plans

"There's potash in them thar hills" might lack the potency of the Klondike's rallying cry, but the discovery is causing passions to run high in the North York Moors.

How Whitby fell victim to potash fertiliser fury

Deep beneath the cherished North York Moors lies a valuable mineral that is dividing local people

Japan to restart two nuclear reactors

Japan today approved the resumption of nuclear power operations at two reactors despite mass public opposition, the first to come back on line after they were all shut down following the Fukushima crisis.

Protesters against the restart of nuclear power plants, shout slogans in front of the Japanese

Japan's power hub braced for big switch-on

Japan's reactors have lain idle since the tsunami crippled the Fukushima plant. Now the government wants to turn them on again. By David McNeill

Sellafield 'needs extra £276 million of taxpayer’s money to complete UK's biggest nuclear construction project'

The company in charge of running Britain’s nuclear reprocessing operation at Sellafield in Cumbria said today that it needs an extra £276 million of taxpayer’s money to complete the single biggest nuclear construction project in the UK.

UN nuclear agency probes Iran uranium find

The UN nuclear agency has found traces of uranium at Iran's underground atomic site enriched to higher than previous levels and closer to what is needed for nuclear weapons, diplomats say.

Downing Street keeps Iran conflict plan under wraps

Downing Street declined today to discuss the UK's contingency plans in the event of a military confrontation between Israel and Iran, amid reports that ministers have asked law officers to examine whether any British involvement would be legal.

Energy reforms to push up costs

Reforms to the UK's electricity market which aim to drive billions of pounds of investment into new nuclear plants and renewables have been published by the Government.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent
Markus Persson: If being that rich is so bad, why not just give it all away?

That's a bit rich

The billionaire inventor of computer game Minecraft says he is bored, lonely and isolated by his vast wealth. If it’s that bad, says Simon Kelner, why not just give it all away?
Euro 2016: Chris Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Wales last qualified for major tournament in 1958 but after several near misses the current crop can book place at Euro 2016 and end all the indifference