Arts and Entertainment

A refugee soldier captured the man who ran Auschwitz. This act of homage follows the chase

The theatre of hate bows out

'For 400 years our poems and paintings have shown black people worn out with toil and struggle. Now we've got to paint pictures of beautiful, fat faces looking into the sunrise.' John Kani, executive director of Johannesburg's Market Theatre

Even in war, justice must prevail

If Serbs responsible for atrocities escape trial, we fail humanity and escalate a spiral of evil If what the Nazis did was not absolutely wrong, then human life is a joke

This wolf boy, this child of god, this myth

Caspar Hauser David Constantine Bloodaxe £6.95

OBITUARIES: Heinz Bernard

Heinz Bernard Lowenstein (Heinz Bernard), actor, director; born Nuremberg 22 December 1923; married Nettie, Lowenstein (two sons, one daughter); died London 18 December 1994.

Ghost of Nuremberg will haunt tribunal: There are no victors in Yugoslavia's war, therefore no 'victor's justice', Judge Goldstone tells Robert Block in The Hague

The workmen building the courtroom in a wing of an old Art Deco insurance building in The Hague go about their jobs with a sense of urgency. In just two weeks, the courtroom, which will be the centre stage of the first international war crimes tribunal in 50 years, will hold its first public hearing.

Mass graft trial opens in Italy

MILAN - What is being billed as the 'Nuremberg' of Italy's political old guard began yesterday when several leaders of the country's traditional political parties went on trial for graft.

Bavarians stir up Sudeten-German row

IN A speech certain to have set alarms bells ringing in Prague, Edmund Stoiber, Prime Minister of the powerful south German state of Bavaria, yesterday called on the German government to step up pressure on the Czech Republic to enter direct talks with representatives of three million Sudeten Germans forcibly expelled from what was then Czechoslovakia after the Second World War.

BOOK REVIEW / Something to hurroosh for: 'John Betjeman: Letters Vol I (1926-51)' Ed. Candida Lycett Green: Methuen, 20 pounds

IN FEBRUARY 1949 George Barnes made a mistake. Instead of a letter, he sent his old friend John Betjeman a blank piece of paper. Back came the reply. 'Dear Commander,' it ran, 'I held the blank paper you sent me to the fire and do not think you need be worried at all by the message that came out in the invisible ink. Of course, when you are in America and entirely on your own you do find certain inclinations running away with you. Give them free play while you are there, but only so far as your conscience will allow, though it looks to me as though your conscience has allowed considerable latitude already.' Barnes was the respected Head of Talks at the BBC, where this letter caused maximum embarrassment - and doubtless considerable glee.

Faith and Reason: The guilt of the passive bystander: In the second article in a series on whether God can be blamed for crimes against humanity, Albert H. Friedlander, Dean of Leo Baeck College, London, and Rabbi of the Westminster Synagogue, says that any jury that wishes to put God on trial would find Him innocent.

THERE ARE few surprises in a chess match, even when Nigel Short plays Garry Kasparov. A minor innovation within the Sicilian Defence might be possible, and cognoscenti hold their breath and await the riposte. But all the games, in the end, are the same, and 'there is nothing new under the sun' (Ecclesiastes). I am not discussing chess at this point but that other game that has to be played, on some darkling field midway between philosophy and religion. Long ago, it was given a name: 'theodicy' - putting God on trial. The Greek philosophers summed it up neatly: if God is omnipotent and evil exists, God must be malevolent. If God is beneficent and evil exists, God cannot be omnipotent. Archibald MacLeish's play Job put it succinctly:

Football: TV forces rematch

THE climax to the German championship was given an added twist yesterday when Bayern Munich and Nuremberg were ordered to replay last Saturday's fixture because video evidence showed that Bayern's opening goal had not crossed the line.

Monster rise for Matthews: Dinosaur-shaped turkey pieces lead profit advance to pounds 11m

BERNARD MATTHEWS is cashing in on the public's appetite for dinosaur products. More than 2 million packets of dinosaur-shaped pieces of turkey are being sold by the company each week.

BOOK REVIEW / Bookshop Window: Ribbentrop - Michael Bloch: Bantam, pounds 9.99

This might be the definitive biography of that great opportunist of Nazism, Joachim von Ribbentrop, a businessman who joined the Nazis as they seized power, and served first as Hitler's ambassador to the United Kingdom until 1938, and then as Foreign Minister. Lacking a vision or a constituency of his own, Ribbentrop played to Hitler's own crazy views, thus winning a reputation as an intellectual giant. Among his ideas: that England and France would never fight, that the United States was not a serious enemy, and that the Soviet Union constituted a reliable, long-term ally. A cowardly minor aristocrat on the make, von Ribbentrop went to the gallows in Nuremberg 'perfectly composed' because of his faith in eternal life.

Games: Getting back on board

GAMES companies bold enough to back their 'back to basics' judgement fared well at the recent British trade show. The change of venue, from Earls Court to Olympia, contributed to a more intimate, yet vibrant atmosphere.

On Tour: The Wonder Stuff

Supporting Big Country on their tour in 1987 was the first time we went out and did a string of dates in a row. A friend of mine said you'll always remember your first tour as being your very best but I don't agree with that at all. Although it was good fun I always felt it has been getting better and better and I'm really looking forward to this British affair.

Letter: Available for Nuremberg

Sir: By a strange slip you say ('A crime that must not be forgotten'; leading article, 20 January) that General Wilhelm Mohnke could probably have been tried at Nuremberg but was in a Russian prison. Most German prisoners were in Russian prisons, if only because of the way the war went in its last stages. There was no difficulty about getting them out if required. I myself interrogated a number by asking the Russians to find them and send them to Nuremberg.
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Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee
World War Z author Max Brooks honours WW1's Harlem Hellfighters in new graphic novel

Max Brooks honours Harlem Hellfighters

The author talks about race, legacy and his Will Smith film option to Tim Walker
Why the league system no longer measures up

League system no longer measures up

Jon Coles, former head of standards at the Department of Education, used to be in charge of school performance rankings. He explains how he would reform the system
Valentine's Day cards: 5 best online card shops

Don't leave it to the petrol station: The best online card shops for Valentine's Day

Can't find a card you like on the high street? Try one of these sites for individual, personalised options, whatever your taste
Diego Costa: Devil in blue who upsets defences is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

Devil in blue Costa is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

The Reds are desperately missing Luis Suarez, says Ian Herbert
Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Former one-day coach says he will ‘observe’ their World Cup games – but ‘won’t be jumping up and down’
Greece elections: In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza

Greece elections

In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza, says Patrick Cockburn
Holocaust Memorial Day: Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears

Holocaust Memorial Day

Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears over Europe
Fortitude and the Arctic attraction: Our fascination with the last great wilderness

Magnetic north

The Arctic has always exerted a pull, from Greek myth to new thriller Fortitude. Gerard Gilbert considers what's behind our fascination with the last great wilderness