News A man in Kenya has woken up in a morgue after he was pronounced dead

The man's family had started making funeral arrangements when he awoke

India: Tribunal ruling against Coca-Cola

The local assembly in the state of Kerala yesterday approved a bill setting up a tribunal to look into compensation claims by residents complaining that a Coca-Cola bottling plant caused environmental damage.

You dirty louse! The rise and rise of nits

Even the PM suffers. David Cameron admitted his kids Nancy and Arthur are afflicted by the pests, now endemic on the heads of Britain’s children (and their parents). Joanna Moorhead scratches that itch

Nature Studies by Michael McCarthy: The 21st century bodes ill for non-human species

If the Earth is eventually to be overwhelmed by the human species, is it a crime to speak up for the Earth? Our morality is anthropocentric: at the heart of our notions of good and bad lies human suffering, and what we can do to avoid it.

Pesticide linked to bee deaths should be suspended, MPs told

A new generation of pesticides is implicated in the widespread deaths of bees and other pollinators and should be suspended in Britain while the Government reviews new scientific evidence about their effects, MPs were told yesterday.

Letters: Pesticides and bees

While ministers talk, bees are still dying

Consuming Issues: Is organic food worth the extra money?

The beetroot in Tesco looked the same: small, peeled and purple. Yet the organic pack was £1 and the other 67p. More of the organic packs – produced without chemical fertilisers and pesticides – had been left on the shelf. Perhaps unsurprisingly, many shoppers have decided it's not worth paying more for chemical-free food while times are hard and organic sales have slumped since 2008. To revive the £1.8bn movement, the Organic Trade Board has begun a £2m advertising campaign, "Why I Love Organic", in magazines such as OK! and Heat. Should shoppers be swayed by its claims about naturalness, taste and animal welfare?

Call to ban pesticides linked to bee deaths

MPs to debate effect of chemicals blamed for weakening resistance to killer viruses

Michael McCarthy: This isn't just about bees – it affects everything

How will we characterise our age? By the birth of the internet? The rise of China? The first black US president? Perhaps in all those ways. But we could also say, less obviously but perhaps more fundamentally, that ours is the age when the insects disappeared.

Michael McCarthy: BBKA oligarchy has buried the truth in its cosy relationship with the pesticide lobby

The saga of the British Beekeepers' Association (BBKA) and its long-term pesticide endorsements is quite extraordinary. For 10 years, the BBKA has been giving its official blessing to four insecticides as "bee-friendly" or "bee-safe" – for example, the May 2001 newsletter BBKA News referred to "the BBKA's endorsement of Fury as a bee-safe product", while another piece in August 2005 said "the products we endorse are bee-friendly when used properly".

Beekeepers fume at association's endorsement of fatal insecticides

Britain's beekeepers are at war over their association's endorsement for money of four insecticides, all of them fatal to bees, made by major chemical companies.

Nature Studies by Michael McCarthy: Have we learned nothing since 'Silent Spring'?

Nicotine, found in tobacco, is a deadly substance – and not only for smokers. It has long been known as a powerful natural insecticide, and its presence in the tobacco crop has evolved to deter pests; it is toxic to virtually all of them (except one, the Carolina sphinx moth, whose fat green caterpillar, known in the US as the tobacco hornworm, has evolved a way of dealing with it).

India's hidden climate change catastrophe

Over the past decade, as crops have failed year after year, 200,000 farmers have killed themselves

India claims further £1bn for Bhopal victims

The Indian government has demanded £1billion additional compensation for the victims of the world's worst industrial disaster, a gas leak at a pesticide plant that killed thousands of people in 1984.

Tests suggest dementia may be linked with pesticide use

People exposed to pesticides for many years may be at greater risk of dementia. The warning comes from a study of 614 French vineyard workers whose mental functioning was tested over a period of up to six years between 1997 and 2003.

Indian Veg 92-93 Chapel Market, London N1

Ethics are shoved down your throat at Indian Veg. But there's still plenty of room for the all-you-can-eat buffet
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence