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This exclusive-use property is the very highest of the high-end, reveals James Palmer

Arts: Tomorrow Never Dies, And Nor Does 007 Bond

After 35 years of active service, most people would retire. But James Bond is about to take on his 18th mission. Jasper Rees raises a glass to his health, while David Thomson would rather he received a bullet all the villians who tried to fire a bullet

Cinema: When breaking in is hard to do

A Group of small-time crooks plan a heist; it goes badly wrong. If I had a vanilla slice for every post-Tarantino film I've seen with that synopsis, I could open my own cake shop. Alan Taylor's Palookaville (15) employs a plot, an environment and an idiolect familiar from a gaggle of recent low to mid-budget thrillers, but thankfully, this film isn't just a lot of gunfights punctuated by fastidious conversations about fast food. Instead, it's a po-mo crime caper with a social conscience, in which three New Jersey deadenders turn to crime to make ends meet. And here's the twist: Taylor's gang of three don't blow anyone's brains out or double- cross each other; they don't even get hubristic on anyone's ass. They're just too nice for that. So nice, in fact, that some of the film's events have the nostalgic, optimistic warmth of Ealing comedy. Imagine if Charles Crichton had directed Reservoir Dogs, and you've a fair idea of what sort of a place Palookaville is.

Just call her Bond

Jasper Rees meets Samantha Bond, the star in the final new play under Richard Eyre's regime

Golf: My time in the sand with Bernhard

Richard Edmondson came under the tutorage of the German master and found him the perfect friend to have when buried in a bunker

James Bond picks German marque

James Bond is driving a German car again in his next movie, it emerged yesterday. Actor Pierce Brosnan (pictured) will have a BMW 750i executive saloon in the new film, Tomorrow Never Dies, which is due to be released in December.

Film: Also showing...Spellbound

The Crucible Nicholas Hytner (12) Mars Attacks! Tim Burton (12) Bound Larry and Andy Wachowski (18)

The IRA: a commercial break

Terry George's beatification of IRA hunger strikers is rightly overshadowed by a late offering from Michelangelo Antonioni

England is forever as Bond stays at home

James Bond has been saved for Britain after swift work by planners, film-makers and businessmen found a new home for the legendary secret agent, writes Louise Jury.

John Lyttle on film

Stars - troublesome creatures. Always demanding more money, bigger trailers, higher billing, personal make-up and hair and costume people, and first-class airline tickets to ship them from Beverly Hills to whichever far-flung location. And all because they're box-office, can "open" a movie, so the first weekend on release doesn't leave everyone with omelette (egg whites only, with scallions) on their face-lifts.

Behind the scenes

You can probably recall the scene, against the atmospheric backdrop of a seething, darkly gothic cityscape a solitary tiny old lady (right) potters along a gloomy street to the door of her lace-curtained cottage. The Ladykillers is one of those classics of British cinema whose location perfectly conveys the black comedy's sense of impending - albeit unrealised - menace. But where was it filmed? A new exhibition at the Museum of London reveals all. "London on Film" examines the hundred years of film-making in the capital. While The Ladykillers was in fact set in a now demolished part of north London, other areas of the city have masqueraded as more exotic locations. Who would have guessed that the St Petersburg recently seen on screen in Goldeneye was in reality the classical frontage of Somerset House in the Strand or that the 1946 version of Great Expectations made inventive use of the ruins of the bomb-damaged City. Similarly, during the 1930s, motorists on London's new North Orbital ring road would have caught tantalising glimpses of the Indian Raj settings in North West Frontier and the space-age city of Things to Come at Denham Studios.

box-office charts

TOP 10 UK

But where's the Aston Martin?

the critics

James Bond, agent of change

The Bond franchise requires new variations on old themes. Like Judi Dench as M. By Adam Mars-Jones

how to be a spy

The resurrection of national heroes can be a risky business. As Pierce Brosnan (right), breathing new life into James Bond, may find when Goldeneye opens across the country tomorrow. But some things just don't change. Q, for example, Desmond Llewelyn's old inventor, who will be called upon to give Bond his techno-briefing. Ejector-seats, torpedo-tipped cigarettes and pen-grenades remain the order of the day.

New Age 007 bonds well with the Prince

A new James Bond film and a new Beatles record in the same week. Close your eyes and it could be 1965, not 1995.
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