Simon Kelner: Virgin Atlantic's idea is verging on the unbearable

It was an exchange which made me realise why I am not rich and powerful. I was telling a friend of mine – a young, wealthy and successful individual – that I thought there was something luxurious about a trans-Atlantic plane journey. You could sit, watch a movie or two, have someone serve you drinks and food, maybe take a little nap and – most satisfying of all – no one could get hold of you.

Simon Kelner: Virgin Atlantic's idea is verging on the unbearable

It was an exchange which made me realise why I am not rich and powerful. I was telling a friend of mine – a young, wealthy and successful individual – that I thought there was something luxurious about a trans-Atlantic plane journey. You could sit, watch a movie or two, have someone serve you drinks and food, maybe take a little nap and – most satisfying of all – no one could get hold of you.

Kylie Minogue and Cheryl Cole boost for The Voice

Kylie Minogue and Cheryl Cole are among the stars lined up for guest appearances on BBC1's The Voice as the show battles a ratings slide.

Demi Moore changes Twitter name to @justdemi

Demi Moore is no longer (at)mrskutcher, in real life or on Twitter.

Malakai during this week's episode of ITV's Britain's Got Talent

Trending: Are the tears of a nine-year-old what we want?

Another week, another scandal in Simon Cowell's empire. Whenever you think it might be losing its lustre, up comes something that catapaults it back into the national conversation.

Sport on TV: To be perfectly Frank, Bruno really should have hit Morgan

Frank Bruno first met Piers Morgan when the latter was a 19-year-old reporter on the South London News and the fighter was challenging for the world heavyweight title for the first time. Now Morgan is one of the richest presenters on television, and certainly the smuggest, and Bruno has spent the decade battling mental illness. If only Frank had lamped him that day back in the mid-Eighties, how different Britain might be. We could have avoided some of the worst excesses of tabloid journalism, culminating in headlines such as "Bonkers Bruno Locked Up".

James Moore: Expect more wonders from the Far East

Outlook Amazing what you can do with Japanese managers. Thanks to the small matter of an £8m bung from the Government, more than 1,000 desperately needed jobs are going to be created in the North-east, where Nissan will build some new cars.

Simon Kelner: George's resemblance to Piers is the least of his worries

We've seen and heard a lot of George Osborne recently. The Chancellor has done the full round of TV and radio shows, not to mention the odd parliamentary appearance in the wake of his recent Budget.

Tiger Woods in action in Florida last week where he eased to victory

'Big Miss' set to dominate Tiger's Masters build-up

Montgomerie blames Woods' management for not blocking publication of Haney's book

It's 'The Voice' vs 'Britain's Got Talent': Round One

Forget the fighting talk, flick between the channels and it's hard to tell which show you're watching
Bill Roache: The veteran actor's refusal to deny that he'd slept with nearly 1,000 women saw him make the tabloid front pages yesterday

Casanova Ken and the other conquest-counters

Corrie's Bill Roache has joined a band of men who have boasted about their vast number of sexual partners. Chaps, we really don't want to know, says John Walsh

Heather Mills to give evidence to Leveson Inquiry

Heather Mills is to give evidence at the Leveson Inquiry into press standards, it has emerged.

Sport on TV: It's hard-hitting stuff when Flintoff says he's all at sea

If ever there was a sportsman from the money-mad professional era who was guaranteed to put a smile on the face of the fans – or even the opposition – then it was Freddie Flintoff. Ebullient big-hitting, big-hearted fast bowling, smacking sixes for his father to catch in the crowd, even consoling Australia's Brett Lee at the moment of victory: this was how he will be remembered, playing as if he was still an amateur, even like the fans themselves would dream of performing.

Last Night's Viewing: Freddie Flintoff: Hidden Side of Sport, BBC1
The Fabulous Baker Brothers, Channel 4

The idea that sport is in any way a morally improving activity should really be insupportable by now, after years of match-fixing, dope scandals and football-star spit-roasts. But the notion that it is character-building still stubbornly clings on. Competition, from Dr Arnold onwards, has been believed to anneal the soul and tutor the spirit. If Freddie Flintoff: Hidden Side of Sport is to be believed, though, we should be protecting our children from exposure to school games, just in case they're unlucky enough to show some talent at them. Flintoff – both a darling and a monster of the red-top back pages – was exploring the subject of depression in sport, partly because of his own experience of a slump in form and morale, and partly because of what happened to his friend Steve Harmison. And the telling thing was that it didn't look as if he'd had trouble at all finding representative cases. Even Vinnie Jones pitched up to confess that he'd thought seriously about walking into the woods with a shotgun.

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