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Suspect stabbed his friend to death after victim insisted prose was superior as literary genre

Expectant father Stephen Mangan gets a helping hand in 'Birthday'

Birthday, Royal Court Upstairs, London
Crow, Borough Hall, London
Utopia, Soho Theatre, Time

Roles are reversed in Joe Penhall's latest play, but the result is more amusing than illuminating

An Inventory of Heaven, By Jane Feaver. Corsair, £14.99

Dysfunctional relationships have been a staple of Jane Feaver's previous work. Her debut novel, According to Ruth, centred on a girl's view of her parents' disintegrating marriage, and Love Me Tender, glimpsed the private lives of inhabitants of a Devon village. Feaver is adroit at capturing claustrophobia and community, with the wistful lives of those seeking salvation in others.

The Letters of TS Eliot Volume 3: 1927-27, Ed Valerie

Yours faithfully, kindly and with modesty, Tom

Album: Saint-Saëns, Orchestral Works – Royal Scottish National Orchestra/Järvi (Chandos)

Fêted from the Middle East to South America (where he wrote the Uruguayan national anthem) during his life-time, Camille Saint-Saëns is remarkable both for the variety and volume of his orientalist music and the sophistication of its orchestration.

Yoko Ono: To The Light, Serpentine Gallery, London

Childish and brainless, Ono lives down to her name

Between the Covers 24/06/2012

Your weekly guide to what's really going on inside the world of books

Luke Wright answers some tough (and not so tough) questions

Luke Wright, Latitude’s Poetry Arena host and co-curator, is one of the UK’s top stand-up poets.

Jean Field: Expert on the poet Walter Savage Landor

Jean Field was an expert on the 19th-century poet Walter Savage Landor, whom she felt had been much maligned by earlier biographers and whose standing she aimed to rescue with her magnum opus Landor: a Biography of Walter Savage Landor (2000). In this book, in which she concentrated on his Warwickshire background – which she herself shared – she unearthed new material, particularly regarding his friendships with other writers such as Charles Dickens, who based the character of Boythorn in Bleak House on him, and Robert and Elizabeth Browning, who took care of him during his last years in Florence.

On the case: 'Manchester Lines' is set in a lost property office

A journey to the heart of Manchester

A new play, set in an office block, reveals the city's secrets

Austerity hits Adrian Mole: secret diarist, aged 45, finds new challenge to village life

The author Sue Townsend has revealed that the once-teenage diarist Adrian Mole is to be the subject of a 10th book – and this time he's suffering austerity anxst.

The Beloved, Bush Theatre, London

The Biblical story of Abraham and Isaac has been turned into many an artistic mediation on how the younger generation may suffer and be sacrificed for the sins of authority-worshipping fathers.

A puppetry prop for the new show of Ted Hughes’s dark poetry collection Crow, in Greenwich

Heads up: Crow

From a war horse to a crow man ... what Handspring did next

Tom Hodgkinson: The bohemian spirit is alive and well

While our image of Notting Hill today may be of a wealthy person's retreat, the area had a more bohemian and radical reputation when I was growing up. A combination of West Indian culture and a punky vibe made it irresistibly glamorous and edgy to me and my friends. It was the land of sound systems, skateboarders, the Clash, the Westway, the Mutoid Waste Company, the carnival and head shops on Portobello Road. It was home to Rough Trade (where I worked for a year when I was 21), Whole Earth foods, second-hand clothes shops and stalls on Portobello Green run by artists. It was the Notting Hill of Jimi Hendrix and of John Michell, the celebrated late cosmologist and author. I suppose it represented creative freedom.

Illumination: David Gascoyne

Night Thoughts: The Surreal Life of the Poet David Gascoyne, By Robert Fraser

Many know about the death by drowning of WS Gilbert; others are aware that in 1933 Ernest Hemingway, incensed by a review, trashed the Paris bookshop in which he read it. Few could point to these incidents' one degree of separation. Such surprises regularly punctuate the soberly engrossing chronicle which Robert Fraser has created around the life of a poet whose modest fame has burned steadily, almost brightly, since his Thirties emergence as a teenage prodigy.

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Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project
Diana Krall: The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai

Diana Krall interview

The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai
Pinstriped for action: A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter

Pinstriped for action

A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter
Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: 'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'

Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: How we met

'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef serves up his favourite Japanese dishes

Bill Granger's Japanese recipes

Stock up on mirin, soy and miso and you have the makings of everyday Japanese cuisine
Michael Calvin: How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us

Michael Calvin's Last Word

How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us