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Suspect stabbed his friend to death after victim insisted prose was superior as literary genre

Expectant father Stephen Mangan gets a helping hand in 'Birthday'

Birthday, Royal Court Upstairs, London
Crow, Borough Hall, London
Utopia, Soho Theatre, Time

Roles are reversed in Joe Penhall's latest play, but the result is more amusing than illuminating

An Inventory of Heaven, By Jane Feaver. Corsair, £14.99

Dysfunctional relationships have been a staple of Jane Feaver's previous work. Her debut novel, According to Ruth, centred on a girl's view of her parents' disintegrating marriage, and Love Me Tender, glimpsed the private lives of inhabitants of a Devon village. Feaver is adroit at capturing claustrophobia and community, with the wistful lives of those seeking salvation in others.

The Letters of TS Eliot Volume 3: 1927-27, Ed Valerie

Yours faithfully, kindly and with modesty, Tom

Album: Saint-Saëns, Orchestral Works – Royal Scottish National Orchestra/Järvi (Chandos)

Fêted from the Middle East to South America (where he wrote the Uruguayan national anthem) during his life-time, Camille Saint-Saëns is remarkable both for the variety and volume of his orientalist music and the sophistication of its orchestration.

Yoko Ono: To The Light, Serpentine Gallery, London

Childish and brainless, Ono lives down to her name

Between the Covers 24/06/2012

Your weekly guide to what's really going on inside the world of books

Luke Wright answers some tough (and not so tough) questions

Luke Wright, Latitude’s Poetry Arena host and co-curator, is one of the UK’s top stand-up poets.

Jean Field: Expert on the poet Walter Savage Landor

Jean Field was an expert on the 19th-century poet Walter Savage Landor, whom she felt had been much maligned by earlier biographers and whose standing she aimed to rescue with her magnum opus Landor: a Biography of Walter Savage Landor (2000). In this book, in which she concentrated on his Warwickshire background – which she herself shared – she unearthed new material, particularly regarding his friendships with other writers such as Charles Dickens, who based the character of Boythorn in Bleak House on him, and Robert and Elizabeth Browning, who took care of him during his last years in Florence.

On the case: 'Manchester Lines' is set in a lost property office

A journey to the heart of Manchester

A new play, set in an office block, reveals the city's secrets

Austerity hits Adrian Mole: secret diarist, aged 45, finds new challenge to village life

The author Sue Townsend has revealed that the once-teenage diarist Adrian Mole is to be the subject of a 10th book – and this time he's suffering austerity anxst.

The Beloved, Bush Theatre, London

The Biblical story of Abraham and Isaac has been turned into many an artistic mediation on how the younger generation may suffer and be sacrificed for the sins of authority-worshipping fathers.

A puppetry prop for the new show of Ted Hughes’s dark poetry collection Crow, in Greenwich

Heads up: Crow

From a war horse to a crow man ... what Handspring did next

Tom Hodgkinson: The bohemian spirit is alive and well

While our image of Notting Hill today may be of a wealthy person's retreat, the area had a more bohemian and radical reputation when I was growing up. A combination of West Indian culture and a punky vibe made it irresistibly glamorous and edgy to me and my friends. It was the land of sound systems, skateboarders, the Clash, the Westway, the Mutoid Waste Company, the carnival and head shops on Portobello Road. It was home to Rough Trade (where I worked for a year when I was 21), Whole Earth foods, second-hand clothes shops and stalls on Portobello Green run by artists. It was the Notting Hill of Jimi Hendrix and of John Michell, the celebrated late cosmologist and author. I suppose it represented creative freedom.

Illumination: David Gascoyne

Night Thoughts: The Surreal Life of the Poet David Gascoyne, By Robert Fraser

Many know about the death by drowning of WS Gilbert; others are aware that in 1933 Ernest Hemingway, incensed by a review, trashed the Paris bookshop in which he read it. Few could point to these incidents' one degree of separation. Such surprises regularly punctuate the soberly engrossing chronicle which Robert Fraser has created around the life of a poet whose modest fame has burned steadily, almost brightly, since his Thirties emergence as a teenage prodigy.

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Minoan Crete and Santorini
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The Greek referendum exposes a gaping hole at the heart of the European Union – its distinct lack of any genuine popular legitimacy

Gaping hole at the heart of the European Union

Treatment of Greece has shown up a lack of genuine legitimacy
Number of young homeless in Britain 'more than three times the official figures'

'Everything changed when I went to the hostel'

Number of young homeless people in Britain is 'more than three times the official figures'
Compton Cricket Club

Compton Cricket Club

Portraits of LA cricketers from notorious suburb to be displayed in London
London now the global money-laundering centre for the drug trade, says crime expert

Wlecome to London, drug money-laundering centre for the world

'Mexico is its heart and London is its head'
The Buddhist temple minutes from Centre Court that helps a winner keep on winning

The Buddhist temple minutes from Centre Court

It helps a winner keep on winning
Is this the future of flying: battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks?

Is this the future of flying?

Battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks
Isis are barbarians – but the Caliphate is a dream at the heart of all Muslim traditions

Isis are barbarians

but the Caliphate is an ancient Muslim ideal
The Brink's-Mat curse strikes again: three tons of stolen gold that brought only grief

Curse of Brink's Mat strikes again

Death of John 'Goldfinger' Palmer the latest killing related to 1983 heist
Greece debt crisis: 'The ministers talk to us about miracles' – why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum

'The ministers talk to us about miracles'

Why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum
Call of the wild: How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate

Call of the wild

How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate
Greece debt crisis: What happened to democracy when it’s a case of 'Vote Yes or else'?

'The economic collapse has happened. What is at risk now is democracy...'

If it doesn’t work in Europe, how is it supposed to work in India or the Middle East, asks Robert Fisk
The science of swearing: What lies behind the use of four-letter words?

The science of swearing

What lies behind the use of four-letter words?
The Real Stories of Migrant Britain: Clive fled from Zimbabwe - now it won't have him back

The Real Stories of Migrant Britain

Clive fled from Zimbabwe - now it won’t have him back
Africa on the menu: Three foodie friends want to popularise dishes from the continent

Africa on the menu

Three foodie friends want to popularise dishes from the hot new continent
Donna Karan is stepping down after 30 years - so who will fill the DKNY creator's boots?

Who will fill Donna Karan's boots?

The designer is stepping down as Chief Designer of DKNY after 30 years. Alexander Fury looks back at the career of 'America's Chanel'