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Suspect stabbed his friend to death after victim insisted prose was superior as literary genre

Books of the year 2013: Poetry

The Selected Poems of Robert Graves (1895-1985) (Faber, £15.99), edited by Michael Longley, is a superb re-introduction to a vastly influential poet who has become almost a secret to the young. War poet, lover, servant of the pitiless muse, comedian – Robert Graves was all these, and blessed with the finest poetic ear of his time.

Home truths: AN Wilson in front of a CS Lewis mural in the writer’s native Belfast
Clive James has been nominated for his translation of Dante’s 'Divine Comedy'

Costa Book Awards 2013: Much-loved author Clive James 'very pleased' with nomination for The Divine Comedy

Television presenter reveals that Dan Brown had read his version and called it 'quite clever'

Mystical: Sir John Tavener, who died last week, at the age of 69, photographed in 2004

John Tavener concert at Southwark Cathedral becomes his memorial service

After the moving encore came the tears

Book review: Big Ray, By Michael Kimball

"I wonder," says Daniel, the grieving narrator of this slim, haunting novel, "if I am making him in to something more than he was because he was my father."

TV review: Crackanory will struggle to have one tenth of the lifespan of its role model

In January 1966, a 17-year-old model, Lesley Hornby, had her hair cut short by celebrity Mayfair stylist Leonard – and Twiggy and her gamine crop went on to become an icon of the Swinging Sixties.

Book of a lifetime: Only the Soul Knows How to Sing, By Kamala Das

As a child I used to think poetry was written exclusively by dead men; that it was a benefit extended to them well after their bones were disintegrating, or they floated about on clouds strumming harps, or whatever it was dead people did.

Book review: Music at Midnight: The Life and Poetry of George Herbert, By John Drury

Country parson, and poet of genius, this quietly intense visionary has the biography he merits

Book review: One Night in Winter, By Simon Sebag Montefiore

Historian Simon Sebag Montefiore, the author of two books on Stalinist Russia, has also turned his hand to fiction. Inspired by "several true stories", this latest novel revisits Moscow during the last years of Stalin, the Red Tsar – an era characterised by paranoia and high-level betrayals. As the book's epilogue reminds us, "the familiar dilemmas of family life, the prizes and perils of children, adultery and career, have higher stakes than if the story was set in Hampstead."

Nick MacKinnon at the Forward Prizes for Poetry Awards in London’s Southbank Centre

Sexually charged poem about learning metric wins Forward Prize

Former maths teacher’s recollection of an unorthodox lesson was a ‘delight’ for judges

Great works: Hieratic Head of Ezra Pound (1914) by Henri Gaudier-Brzeska

National Gallery of Art, Washington DC

Page 3 Profile: Alice Oswald, poet

A poet?! You have 10 seconds before I switch off… 10, 9 –

The Bonus Track: Songs from kids' stories, prog-rock poetry and an album biggie from Haim

A sideways look at the world of music

Between the Covers 22/09/13

What's really going on in the world of books

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On your feet! Spending at least two hours a day standing reduces the risk of heart attacks, cancer and diabetes, according to new research

On your feet!

Spending half the day standing 'reduces risk of heart attacks and cancer'
Liverpool close in on Milner signing

Liverpool close in on Milner signing

Reds baulk at Christian Benteke £32.5m release clause
With scores of surgeries closing, what hope is there for the David Cameron's promise of 5,000 more GPs and a 24/7 NHS?

The big NHS question

Why are there so few new GPs when so many want to study medicine?
Big knickers are back: Thongs ain't what they used to be

Thongs ain't what they used to be

Big knickers are back
Thurston Moore interview

Thurston Moore interview

On living in London, Sonic Youth and musical memoirs
In full bloom

In full bloom

Floral print womenswear
From leading man to Elephant Man, Bradley Cooper is terrific

From leading man to Elephant Man

Bradley Cooper is terrific
In this the person to restore our trust in the banks?

In this the person to restore our trust in the banks?

Dame Colette Bowe - interview
When do the creative juices dry up?

When do the creative juices dry up?

David Lodge thinks he knows
The 'Cher moment' happening across fashion just now

Fashion's Cher moment

Ageing beauty will always be more classy than all that booty
Thousands of teenage girls enduring debilitating illnesses after routine school cancer vaccination

Health fears over school cancer jab

Shock new Freedom of Information figures show how thousands of girls have suffered serious symptoms after routine HPV injection
Fifa President Sepp Blatter warns his opponents: 'I forgive everyone, but I don't forget'

'I forgive everyone, but I don't forget'

Fifa president Sepp Blatter issues defiant warning to opponents
Extreme summer temperatures will soon cause deaths of up to 1,700 more Britons a year, says government report

Weather warning

Extreme summer temperatures will soon cause deaths of up to 1,700 more Britons a year, says government report
LSD: Speaking to volunteer users of the drug as trials get underway to see if it cures depression and addiction

High hopes for LSD

Meet the volunteer users helping to see if it cures depression and addiction
German soldier who died fighting for UK in Battle of Waterloo should be removed from museum display and given dignified funeral, say historians

Saving Private Brandt

A Belgian museum's display of the skeleton of a soldier killed at Waterloo prompts calls for him to be given a dignified funeral