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Suspect stabbed his friend to death after victim insisted prose was superior as literary genre

Poetry round-up: from the buzz around Helen Mort to Andrew Philip's 'sheer joy' in language

Verses to be savoured long after the thrills have faded

EC president Herman Van Rompuy

Composer to release album featuring haikus by EC president Herman Van Rompuy

His love of compact Japanese verse has earned him the nickname 'Haiku Herman', and soon the president of the European Council will be able to enjoy some of his own compositions with a musical accompaniment.

Wipers Times: Back row: (L-R) Pearson (Julian-Rhind Tutt), Roberts (Ben Chaplin), Harris (Steve Oram). Front Row (L-R): Barnes (Hugh Skinner), Henderson (Jarrod Cooke), Dodd (Josh O’Connor), Smith (Colin Ash)

TV review: The Wipers Times, BBC2 - A bit like Blackadder, only true

What would you do if you stumbled upon an abandoned printing press amid the hell of the First World War? The answer, according to Ian Hislop and Nick Newman's entertaining The Wipers Times, is bring out a satirical newspaper taking swipes at everyone from the top brass to the "Boche".

Book review: Airmail: the Letters of Robert Bly and Tomas Tranströmer, Edited by Thomas R Smith

"It's possible that while a bird is building its nest an idea for a song it has never sung rises to its small head. So with us certain thoughts flow upward into our head only when language is being used, and used calmly." That applies particularly, continues this letter of January 1977, to those engaged on prose-poems, a miniature but intense form to which both Robert Bly and his recipient, Tomas Tranströmer, were then greatly drawn.

Selected Poems, by Robert Graves, edited by Michael Longley. Faber & Faber, £15.99

Superb artistry marks the verse of a writer who survived the trenches and built his own myth

Invisible Ink: No 188 - EC Bentley

Books are often dedicated to other writers. Recently this column looked at Edward Phillips Oppenheim, a dedicatee of P G Wodehouse. Here's another: G K Chesteron's novel about anarchist terrorism, The Man Who Was Thursday, is dedicated to E C Bentley, born in 1875. The pair had met as schoolboys at St Paul's and became fast friends. Bentley went to Oxford, but left law studies to become a journalist, in which profession he continued for most of his life.

Martin Luther King’s ‘dream’ is not fulfilled by a first black President

King warned it would not be easy to “transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood” and he was right

Book review: Imagining Alexandria, By Louis de Bernières

A worthy homage and a delight

Book review: Tampa, By Alissa Nutting

A paedophile tells all – we learn nothing

Nick Helm - 'One Man Mega Myth'

Edinburgh 2013: Nick Helm and John Kearns tackle failed machismo for laughs

Nick Helm: One Man Mega Myth

John Kearns: Sight Gags for Perverts

Franklin D'Olier Reeve

F D Reeve: Poet, novelist and Russian translator

In the early stages of his career, the poet F D Reeve found himself best-known as the translator who accompanied Robert Frost on his 1962 visit to the Soviet Union, the man in the middle of Frost's showdown with Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev. Years later, having established himself as a poet, novelist and translator, Reeve would find himself overshadowed again – by his eldest son, Christopher, who achieved fame playing Superman in the smash 1978 movie hit.

Al Lubel

Edinburgh 2013: Al Lubel is Mentally Al - His performance is like an elongated beat poem

If you see Al Lubel you'll never forget his name. That's because the middle-aged New Yorker spends much of his mostly captivating hour playing with the sound of it - though not quite as much time as he spends describing how his over-protective Jewish mother smothered him.

Neil Hilborn

Page 3 Profile: Neil Hilborn, Poet

Slam poetry? It’s hardly Wordsworth.

Bank's bumper send-off for Sir Mervyn King

Sir Mervyn King received a £10,000 portrait of himself and other retirement presents worth £3,000 from the Bank of England last month, it emerged yesterday.

Neil Hilborn set the twitterverse aflame

So, art never goes viral? The OCD poet who won over the web

There are many unwritten rules of the internet but the greatest of them is this: art never goes viral. It just doesn’t. If you want something to travel round the world like a particularly virulent strain of glandular fever, it must showcase something “cute” (has ever a word been as freighted as “cute”?), or contain gratuitous violence. Them’s the rules and no mistake.

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Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee