Voices

It is a curious phenomenon, that those who purport to love the Royals wilfully inflict so much misery upon them

Matthew Norman: Press freedom is too crucial to be left to politicians

A day before Lord Justice Leveson passes sentence, Dr Johnson's witticism about the Ritalin-esque qualities of imminent execution seems hopelessly inaccurate. Far from being concentrated wonderfully by the prospect of the noose, my mind finds itself semi-paralysed by a nebulous sense of dread. There, it is hardly alone. The whole industry lives in sickly terror today that his lordship will don the black cap tomorrow, by way of recommending a form of statutory control over the press, and the lure of pre-emptive hysteria is hard to resist.

Newspapers accused of keeping readers in dark on press regulation

Media owners accused of using selective statistics to fight reform said to fight press reform with selective statistics

Leveson wades into The Thick Of It as inquiry suffers sense of humour failure

As a satire of British public life, The Thick of It, is widely admired. But when it was revealed that the comedy would pillory public inquiries, it seems the Leveson Inquiry into press standards suffered a sense of humour failure.

Prince Harry has returned to Afghanistan

Nude Prince Harry photos: St James's Palace decides against making formal complaint

Prince Harry's aides have announced they will not be making a formal complaint to the newspaper watchdog about the Sun's publication of nude photos of him.

The positive power of the press must be recognised

As a wholesale demolition of our trade, Lord Leveson's letter takes some beating

Murdoch: saw initial failure to run the photos as 'humiliating'

Angry Murdoch used Harry photos to defy Leveson

The owner of 'The Sun' intervened personally to run the pictures of the naked prince

Lord Justice Leveson has 'no truck' with censorship

A judge overseeing an inquiry into press standards today said he would have “no truck” with censorship.

The editor-in-chief of the Daily Mail, Paul Dacre, yesterday gave Lord Justice Leveson his ideas on press regulation

Newspaper industry sets out radical reform of ethics rules

Press could face fines of up to £1m under proposals seen as preferable to any state regulation

Maureen Beattie, Billy Boyd and John Bett in <i>Enquirer</i>, Matthew Tennyson

Enquirer, The Hub at Pacific Quay, Glasgow
Richard III, Shakespeare's Globe, London
Making Noises Quietly, Donmar, London

With the newspaper industry in crisis, it's a shame journalists can't make a decent drama out of it

Julian Assange would not reveal where today's emails had come from

Leveson Inquiry: Julian Assange likens coverage of him to that of the McCanns

Julian Assange has claimed he has suffered from inaccurate and negative media coverage "possibly on a scale not seen since the abuse of the McCanns".

Liberty's Exiles, By Maya Jasanoff

The British are going! Then, so are we ...

The Leveson Inquiry who's who: First phase

We run through some of the most important faces to take to the witness stand over the past four months

Paul Staines, aka Guido Fawkes at the Leveson Inquiry yesterday

Sunday Mirror editor 'told staff phone hacking was OK'

The founder of the political blog Guido Fawkes yesterday alleged that the Sunday Mirror editor, Tina Weaver, had personally authorised her staff to obtain information by hacking and blagging.

Leveson Inquiry: PCC 'scapegoat' in hacking scandal'

The press watchdog felt it had been made a "scapegoat" over its handling of the phone-hacking scandal, the Leveson Inquiry heard today.

Mail editor knew of detective work

The editor of the Daily Mail was aware the newspaper was using search agencies, but not the extent to which they were doing so, he told the inquiry into press standards today.

Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?