Julian Assange is trying to help Edward Snowden claim asylum

The Snowden affair is reviving Cold War politics

American suspicions of Russia have reignited in wake of the whistleblower's flight

Police inquiry into health watchdog 'cover-up'

Police are investigating whether any criminal offence was committed during an alleged cover-up at the health watchdog. Cumbria Constabulary said it would examine a report, which detailed how officials may have suppressed a damning internal review into inspections at Furness General Hospital.

Google ordered to delete data collected by Street View cars

Camera vehicles collected information from unsecured WiFi networks

Charles Saatchi with his wife, Nigella Lawson, in March last year

What Nigella-gate tells us about public and private space

Those who would shame a man on the street might not react the same if they witnessed a celebrity argument. That's a depressing reality for women in the public eye

Google was ordered to pay a $7m (£4.6m) fine and agreed to destroy emails, passwords and browsing histories collected as Street View cars surveyed neighbourhoods in the US between 2008 and 2010

France leads European round of attacks against Google's privacy policy

National privacy commission threaten fines of up to €300,000 if policies are not changed within 3 months.

Gabriel Weinberg is the CEO and founder of DuckDuckGo, a search engine that doesn't track its users.

An interview with DuckDuckGo CEO on the future of anonymous searching

Gabriel Weinberg tells us why he thinks people are turning away from Google

Use of 'anonymous' search engine rockets following PRISM scandal

DuckDuckGo, a search site that does not track its users, announced traffic has nearly doubled

Google founder Sergey Brin (L) adjusts a pair of Project Glass glasses on designer Diane von Furstenberg. REUTERS/Carlo

International group of Privacy Commissioners challenge Google over Glass

Countries including Canada, Israel and Australia write a letter to Larry Page over privacy concerns for Google Glass

Charleigh-Jade Disbrey who was killed by a high-speed train in a suspected suicide

Boy and girl, aged 18 and 15, killed in Hertforshire by high-speed train in suspected suicide

Two teenagers died last night after being hit by a high-speed train in Hertforshire, in a suspected suicide.

A Yahoo! out front of their headquarters in California. REUTERS/Kimberly White

Prism scandal latest: Yahoo reveals 12,000 requests for users' data from US government, following lead of Apple, Facebook and Microsoft

Figures show that law enforcement made over 12,000 requests between December 2012 and May 2013

Paul Gascoigne attends a match at his former club, Tottenham Hotspur

Former football star Paul Gascoigne sues the Daily Star over 'drugs madness' video

He denies the paper's claim that he injected cocaine

Cyber Culture: If Al Capone had a digital money reserve...

The chances are that the recent shutdown of the payment service Liberty Reserve didn't impinge much on your consciousness, unless you have a habit of making no-questions-asked transactions online.

William Hague says he has a ‘high level of confidence’ that British spies do not ‘indiscriminately trawl’ through people’s emails

Prism scandal: Foreign Secretary William Hague's vagueness on US spying fails to reassure MPs and public over covert GCHQ deal with NSA

Civil liberties groups say Government’s approach to secrecy is similar to that of China

Woman's body found on beach

Police searching for a missing woman have discovered a body on a beach.

Picture of a frail Nelson Mandela in hospital on an earlier stay

Nelson Mandela back in hospital with 'serious' lung infection

Nelson Mandela has been admitted to hospital in a “serious but stable” condition as a result of a lung infection.

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Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine