Voices Little security: rents are the biggest factor in the cost of living crisis

If we don't like rich landlords then we can raise taxes on the rich generally, but it will be a brave politician who suggests it

Late payers face interest charges after EU directive comes into force

Businesses are to come under pressure to pay all invoices within 60 days after an European directive came into force over the weekend.

The report projected a 50 per cent increase in numbers of over-65s between 2010 and 2030

Demographic time bomb: Government 'woefully underprepared' to deal with Britain's ageing population

The Government is “woefully underprepared” for a demographic time bomb that will see the number of people aged over 65 living in Britain leap by nearly five million in two decades, a report warned today.

According to the study, women who had just received their degree were more consistently at the lower end of the salary range

Graduate pay gap: Same degrees. Same jobs. But, for women, still not the same pay

Study reveals newly qualified women still earn thousands of pounds less than men

Enough of this state ownership 'nonsense': Bank chief Sir Mervyn King calls for RBS split

Sir Mervyn King today called for the Royal Bank of Scotland to be split up and sold off within a year to end the “nonsense” of state ownership.

George Osborne in Eastleigh last week

Britain's loss of AAA credit rating a 'humiliating blow' to George Osborne, says Ed Balls

The Chancellor George Osborne has been accused of having suffered a “humiliating blow” after Britain was stripped of its AAA credit rating.

Anthony Hilton: Shared audits add up to a sensible solution

Lunch on Wednesday with Michael Snyder, chair of the Professional and Businesses Services Group, one of the network of advisory committees for government. He, in his day job, is long-time head of Kingston Smith, a mid-sized accounting firm.

Barely noticed, civil war is raging in Whitehall

Government ministers are riding roughshod over the civil service, and that leads to government by cock-up and a loss of morale in Whitehall

If You Don't Let Us Dream, We Won't Let You Sleep at the Royal Court theatre

If You Don't Let Us Dream We Won't Let You Sleep, Royal Court, London

Anders Lustgarten's play begins, promisingly enough, as a dystopian satire which takes us on a darkly absurd extrapolation of the “market knows best” approach to austerity.

Damian Green, Minister for Policing and Criminal Justice

'The height of hypocrisy': Damian Green criticised for justice system transparency call as Government pushes through secret court proposals

Minister Damian Green was accused of hypocrisy tonight after he insisted that transparency was key to reforming the justice system at a time when the Government is pushing through proposals for secret courts.

Anthony Hilton: Flawed plan to rebuild Britain with no money

The Government wants the private sector to finance the huge costs of nuclear power stations and hopes French company EDF will shortly kick off its new build.

British workers worse off than a decade ago

British workers have experienced a lost decade of earnings growth thanks to the global financial crisis, with average real wages no higher in 2012 than they were in 2003, according to the Office for National Statistics.

Simon Read: Last act not yet over for gold-plated pensions

Gold-plated final-salary pension schemes have been in terminal decline for more than a decade. The Coalition's policy of trying to shore up the economy by pumping more and more money into it has simply hastened the crisis and persuaded more pension trustees to panic and shut attractive schemes.

Greek police storm metro workers sit-in as strike goes on

Greek riot police stormed a train depot in Athens on Friday to disperse subway staff defying government orders to end their strike, intensifying a confrontation that has paralysed public transport in the city.

Unemployment hits a record high in Spain

Spain's woes have reached a new peak as the beleaguered nation's austerity programme drove unemployment to a record 26 per cent, official figures showed.

Amol Rajan: Maybe, just maybe, our MPs should be better paid

In December, I met an exceptionally talented young Labour MP for coffee. She has merits that most employers would salivate at: a fierce intelligence, excellent communication skills, judgement and motivation. Best of all, she has an inspirational concern for social justice and solidarity with the poor and needy.

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Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 23 January 2015
Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project