Puerto Rico

The Big Six: Wine country hotels

Beltane Ranch, Sonoma, California

Set in the heart of the Sonoma Valley north of San Francisco, the Beltane Ranch is a family-run working farm producing wine, grass-fed beef and olive oil. Built in 1892, the romantic verandah-wrapped shingle house is one of the area's most charming places to stay. There are five airy guestrooms decorated with antiques and heirlooms and a cottage looking out over gardens of organic vegetables, flowers and orchards. The property, which grows chardonnay, zinfandel, syrah and cabernet sauvignon grapes, produced its first vintage in 2009. It's also well placed for exploring the wineries of the 17-mile long Valley of the Moon.

New York Post editor Col Allan must disclose cartoon talks with Rupert

The editor-in-chief of the New York Post, Col Allan, can no longer invoke so-called "editorial privilege" to avoid revealing details of conversations between himself and the newspaper's owner, Rupert Murdoch, after it published a cartoon in early 2009 that appeared to liken President Barack Obama to a chimpanzee, a New York judge has ruled.

Nik Wallenda's Niagara tightrope triumph

Nik, a seventh-generation member of the daredevil and circus legends, the Flying Wallendas, became the first to walk a tightrope over the full 1,800 feet of the gorge, fulfilling a life's ambition and boosting tourism

Julie Burchill: Say goodbye to the Enlightenment. We are living in the

They call him THE GOATSUCKER. Or rather they did. Because the chupacabra – a fearsome monster first spotted in 1995, who according to the Fortean Times, is the third most famous mythical beast after Bigfoot and Nessie (which sounds like an R&B producer duo about to open shop with Tinie Tempah) – has recently been revealed as a hoax by the other, smarter FT.

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Traveller's Eye: New travel photography collection lets readers

A new collection of travel photography lets readers pinpoint for themselves where in the world each image was taken. Earthbound: A Rough Guide to the World in Pictures contains more than 250 images, as well as personal insights by the photographers. It also uses "QR codes" – a form of bar code that can be scanned in on a mobile phone or PDA to take the reader direct to the image location on Google Maps. If you don't have the right technology, no problem: just use the latitude and longitude coordinates next to each image (also provided here, along with brief extracts from Earthbound), which do just the same thing. Simply type them into Google maps (maps.google.co.uk) and the software will zoom in on the correct location.