Arts and Entertainment

Mohammed Ali  used to boast that when boxing,  he would float like a butterfly and sting like a bee. So it is with Germiane Greer. She writes lightly, gracefully even when agitating for a cause. But the words still sting. And unsettle. Here she consciously creates a quasi-religious epic out of a part of her remarkable life when she decided to restore a small, wrecked rainforest in Australia, her homeland. The tone is apocalyptic, themes existential and critical: (wo)man not against, but ardently for wondrous, pitiless and predatory nature. She, the Lionheart, is awed, meets devastation, fears cataclysms, intuits prophecies, bears historical and biological guilt,  seeks redemption and takes stupendous, fervent  action. It really is some story.

White Beech: The Rainforest Years by Germaine Greer; book review

Mohammed Ali  used to boast that when boxing,  he would float like a butterfly and sting like a bee. So it is with Germiane Greer. She writes lightly, gracefully even when agitating for a cause. But the words still sting. And unsettle. Here she consciously creates a quasi-religious epic out of a part of her remarkable life when she decided to restore a small, wrecked rainforest in Australia, her homeland. The tone is apocalyptic, themes existential and critical: (wo)man not against, but ardently for ITALS PREVIOUS WD wondrous, pitiless and predatory nature. She, the Lionheart, is awed, meets devastation, fears cataclysms, intuits prophecies, bears historical and biological guilt,  seeks redemption and takes stupendous, fervent  action. It really is some story.

White Beech: The Rainforest Years by Germaine Greer; book review

Mohammed Ali  used to boast that when boxing,  he would float like a butterfly and sting like a bee. So it is with Germiane Greer. She writes lightly, gracefully even when agitating for a cause. But the words still sting. And unsettle. Here she consciously creates a quasi-religious epic out of a part of her remarkable life when she decided to restore a small, wrecked rainforest in Australia, her homeland. The tone is apocalyptic, themes existential and critical: (wo)man not against, but ardently for ITALS PREVIOUS WD wondrous, pitiless and predatory nature. She, the Lionheart, is awed, meets devastation, fears cataclysms, intuits prophecies, bears historical and biological guilt,  seeks redemption and takes stupendous, fervent  action. It really is some story.

Making corporate responsibility appealing: WWF's 'Unseen'

For do-gooders the world over it's a familiar problem. How do you make charity, or in this case corporate responsibility, appeal to a wide audience with a short attention span?

Book review: 'White Beech' by Germaine Greer

Germaine Greer planting some trees, is there a whole book in that? The answer is a resounding “yes” after reading this heartfelt, sharp and meticulously researched account of the author’s decade-long efforts to rebuild a small corner of rainforest in her home country of Australia.

The olinguito was found in the forests of Colombia and Ecuador

Welcome from the jungle: The amazing new species we discovered this year

The year we said hello to the olinguito, the kabomani tapir, the Cambodian tailorbird, the leaf-tailed gecko and the tinkerbella wasp

Boys playing street football during the FIFA Confederations Cup Brazil 2013

World cup of travel: Where to go in 2014 - starting with Brazil

Thirty-two countries qualified for the Fifa tournament – but which will be our favourite destinations in 2014 and what do they have to offer that's new? Over a series of articles, Chris Leadbeater studies the form, starting with the hosts ...

Roy Hodgson is hoping the extra day in Manaus will aid the players' acclimatisation

World Cup 2014: England opt for extra time in hot and humid Manaus

Roy Hodgson wants his side to acclimatise to the Amazonian conditions

Manaus Stadium

World Cup 2014: Roy Hodgson plans scouting mission to Manaus

The England manager wants to assess potential bases in the Amazonian city

Workers at the Arena Amazonia in Manaus, Brazil, where a man died after plunging 35 metres (115 feet) during construction

Brazil World Cup: Worker dies after 115 feet stadium fall

Five people have now died in the construction of Brazil’s World Cup stadiums, while a sixth has died from a heart attack on the job

Roy Hodgson's England side will begin the 2014 World Cup in Manaus, where fans have been warned of meeting alligators during the night

World Cup 2014: England v Italy kick-off could change from 2am start as Manaus tourist board warn of 'alligator risk'

Broadcasters want the 2am GMT kick-off brought forward while fans have been warned that 'it is possible to meet alligators at night' in the Amazonian city

Simon Calder, Travel Editor for The Independent, is advising on travel to Brazil for those heading out for the FIFA World Cup in 2014
Manaus Stadium

World Cup 2014: 'England aren't welcome here', says mayor of Manaus after Roy Hodgson admits he'd like to avoid the Amazon city

Arthur Virgilio admitted that he'd prefer to have a 'better' team playing in his city

A fan inspects the damage at the partly finished Arena Corinthians in Sao Paulo, where two people died in an accident

World Cup 2014 stadium collapse: Deaths in Sao Paulo Arena Corinthians add to worries ahead of tournament

Fifa concerned at slow construction pace and Brazilian public’s protests over costs

Indigenous people in the Brazilian Amazon will be trained to shoot in a competitive environment

Olympic scouts comb the Amazon for native archers to compete at 2016 Games

Tribespeople given intensive training at Olympic village to become athletes

Paperback review: The World Until Yesterday By Jared Diamond

The World Until Yesterday opens with a fascinating scene: Port Moresby airport in Papua New Guinea, 2006, a picture of modernity, staffed by New Guineans, tapping on computers, screening baggage, flying planes. Yet it is only 80 years or so since the New Guinea Highlands were “discovered” by Australia. The grandparents of today’s New Guinean pilots, clerks and baggage handlers were still using stone tools.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
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Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project
Diana Krall: The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai

Diana Krall interview

The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai
Pinstriped for action: A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter

Pinstriped for action

A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter
Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: 'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'

Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: How we met

'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef serves up his favourite Japanese dishes

Bill Granger's Japanese recipes

Stock up on mirin, soy and miso and you have the makings of everyday Japanese cuisine
Michael Calvin: How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us

Michael Calvin's Last Word

How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us