Arts and Entertainment

Mohammed Ali  used to boast that when boxing,  he would float like a butterfly and sting like a bee. So it is with Germiane Greer. She writes lightly, gracefully even when agitating for a cause. But the words still sting. And unsettle. Here she consciously creates a quasi-religious epic out of a part of her remarkable life when she decided to restore a small, wrecked rainforest in Australia, her homeland. The tone is apocalyptic, themes existential and critical: (wo)man not against, but ardently for wondrous, pitiless and predatory nature. She, the Lionheart, is awed, meets devastation, fears cataclysms, intuits prophecies, bears historical and biological guilt,  seeks redemption and takes stupendous, fervent  action. It really is some story.

White Beech: The Rainforest Years by Germaine Greer; book review

Mohammed Ali  used to boast that when boxing,  he would float like a butterfly and sting like a bee. So it is with Germiane Greer. She writes lightly, gracefully even when agitating for a cause. But the words still sting. And unsettle. Here she consciously creates a quasi-religious epic out of a part of her remarkable life when she decided to restore a small, wrecked rainforest in Australia, her homeland. The tone is apocalyptic, themes existential and critical: (wo)man not against, but ardently for ITALS PREVIOUS WD wondrous, pitiless and predatory nature. She, the Lionheart, is awed, meets devastation, fears cataclysms, intuits prophecies, bears historical and biological guilt,  seeks redemption and takes stupendous, fervent  action. It really is some story.

White Beech: The Rainforest Years by Germaine Greer; book review

Mohammed Ali  used to boast that when boxing,  he would float like a butterfly and sting like a bee. So it is with Germiane Greer. She writes lightly, gracefully even when agitating for a cause. But the words still sting. And unsettle. Here she consciously creates a quasi-religious epic out of a part of her remarkable life when she decided to restore a small, wrecked rainforest in Australia, her homeland. The tone is apocalyptic, themes existential and critical: (wo)man not against, but ardently for ITALS PREVIOUS WD wondrous, pitiless and predatory nature. She, the Lionheart, is awed, meets devastation, fears cataclysms, intuits prophecies, bears historical and biological guilt,  seeks redemption and takes stupendous, fervent  action. It really is some story.

Making corporate responsibility appealing: WWF's 'Unseen'

For do-gooders the world over it's a familiar problem. How do you make charity, or in this case corporate responsibility, appeal to a wide audience with a short attention span?

Book review: 'White Beech' by Germaine Greer

Germaine Greer planting some trees, is there a whole book in that? The answer is a resounding “yes” after reading this heartfelt, sharp and meticulously researched account of the author’s decade-long efforts to rebuild a small corner of rainforest in her home country of Australia.

The olinguito was found in the forests of Colombia and Ecuador

Welcome from the jungle: The amazing new species we discovered this year

The year we said hello to the olinguito, the kabomani tapir, the Cambodian tailorbird, the leaf-tailed gecko and the tinkerbella wasp

Boys playing street football during the FIFA Confederations Cup Brazil 2013

World cup of travel: Where to go in 2014 - starting with Brazil

Thirty-two countries qualified for the Fifa tournament – but which will be our favourite destinations in 2014 and what do they have to offer that's new? Over a series of articles, Chris Leadbeater studies the form, starting with the hosts ...

Roy Hodgson is hoping the extra day in Manaus will aid the players' acclimatisation

World Cup 2014: England opt for extra time in hot and humid Manaus

Roy Hodgson wants his side to acclimatise to the Amazonian conditions

Manaus Stadium

World Cup 2014: Roy Hodgson plans scouting mission to Manaus

The England manager wants to assess potential bases in the Amazonian city

Workers at the Arena Amazonia in Manaus, Brazil, where a man died after plunging 35 metres (115 feet) during construction

Brazil World Cup: Worker dies after 115 feet stadium fall

Five people have now died in the construction of Brazil’s World Cup stadiums, while a sixth has died from a heart attack on the job

Roy Hodgson's England side will begin the 2014 World Cup in Manaus, where fans have been warned of meeting alligators during the night

World Cup 2014: England v Italy kick-off could change from 2am start as Manaus tourist board warn of 'alligator risk'

Broadcasters want the 2am GMT kick-off brought forward while fans have been warned that 'it is possible to meet alligators at night' in the Amazonian city

Simon Calder, Travel Editor for The Independent, is advising on travel to Brazil for those heading out for the FIFA World Cup in 2014
Manaus Stadium

World Cup 2014: 'England aren't welcome here', says mayor of Manaus after Roy Hodgson admits he'd like to avoid the Amazon city

Arthur Virgilio admitted that he'd prefer to have a 'better' team playing in his city

A fan inspects the damage at the partly finished Arena Corinthians in Sao Paulo, where two people died in an accident

World Cup 2014 stadium collapse: Deaths in Sao Paulo Arena Corinthians add to worries ahead of tournament

Fifa concerned at slow construction pace and Brazilian public’s protests over costs

Indigenous people in the Brazilian Amazon will be trained to shoot in a competitive environment

Olympic scouts comb the Amazon for native archers to compete at 2016 Games

Tribespeople given intensive training at Olympic village to become athletes

Paperback review: The World Until Yesterday By Jared Diamond

The World Until Yesterday opens with a fascinating scene: Port Moresby airport in Papua New Guinea, 2006, a picture of modernity, staffed by New Guineans, tapping on computers, screening baggage, flying planes. Yet it is only 80 years or so since the New Guinea Highlands were “discovered” by Australia. The grandparents of today’s New Guinean pilots, clerks and baggage handlers were still using stone tools.

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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

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It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

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Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

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Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine